D3 Football: Catching Up with MIT First-Year Coach Brian Bubna

Brian Bubna
Brian Bubna directs both the MIT offense and defense during Tuesday’s morning session at Steinbrenner Stadium. (PHOTO CREDIT: Matt Noonan)

By Matt Noonan | @MattNoonan11

Earlier today, I unveiled some takeaways from what I saw from yesterday’s meeting with the MIT football team.

But after practiced concluded, I had a chance to quickly catch-up with first-year coach Brian Bubna, who is eager to lead the Engineers into their first game next Friday, August 31st when they host Becker College at Steinbrenner Stadium (kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m.).

Here are some takeaways from my conversation with Coach Bubna, who is no stranger to the Engineers football team. Bubna has spent nine seasons with the program, and was most recently the squad’s defensive and recruiting coordinator before being named the head coach in March.

On creating a fun, but competitive environment: “We try to keep it competitive and fun because these guys have so much academic responsibilities and internships, so when they get out here it has to be fun and it has to be excitable, too. We work hard and have fun doing it, so the guys enjoy it. We go from drill to drill with different stuff. We try to change it up, so it is not the same thing every day, so we can keep them on their toes.”

On what party means to the MIT football team: “Yeah, that is just kind of our definition for how we want to go about working hard or what our intensity level is and just how we want to do things each day. So, it is about going hard and having fun, so that is what party means to us.”

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Udgam Goyal receives some advice from Coach Bubna during Tuesday’s morning session. (PHOTO CREDIT: Matt Noonan)

On inching closer to the start of a new season: “There is still a lot of work that needs to be done, so as coaches we’re going, ‘oh man, we’ve got to work this situation, these scenarios or work these different special teams’ things,’ so there is so much to work on and so much to practice, and even going through it once (or) twice is not enough. You need to get more reps in, so I think the guys are getting more and more excited for our first game, while the coaches are still thinking about what we need to accomplish between now and then, but that is just part of being a coach.”

On being more involved with the game plan instead of just focusing on defense: “It definitely adds to the amount that you have to look at and worry about when putting together a game plan. So it’s great if the defense looks great, but on the other hand it’s like well, what was the issue offensively that we have to worry about? So, it has to be all offense, defense and special teams – it can’t just be a one-sided plan, so it adds to the amount that you have to look at, but we’ll make it work.”

On more young coaches (or former players) that want to get into coaching: “It is one of these things where if you want to try and get into coaching, you kind of have to do it early on or after you graduate. I started a bit later than most guys, but you have to get in when you’re young. It does take a while to move up, but we have been pretty fortunate here at MIT with a lot of our coaches coming back year after year. Some of them started as volunteers, but are now paid coaches, but I think being a little bit on the younger side helps with relating to the guys because you’re younger, as well. Also, the rule changes you see in the NFL and college shows that every year football is changing and there is new kickoff rules this year, so every year is changing and you have to be adaptable to it. I don’t think any other sport has changed as much as football has in the past 10-to-20 years to make it safer, competitive and entertaining, but these are all good changes.”


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