On This Date In History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020

OTDApr11th2020

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Weekend, everyone!

We hope your Saturday is filled with sunshine (and better weather) compared to earlier this week when we had some rain (and overcast skies).

As usual, we will continue to pump out this post every day with hopes to bring a smile to everyone’s face during this unusual and scary time.

Be well, stay safe, and have a wonderful rest of your morning (and day), everyone!


On This Date in History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020 

  • 1917: Babe Ruth tossed a complete game while recording one run and one hit during four at-bats as the Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees, 10-3, in their season-opener at the Polo Grounds. Ruth retired just one batter of 35 batters he faced while yielding just three runs on three hits to go with three walks. Boston’s Harry Hooper concluded the contest with three runs and three hits.
  • 1961: The Boston Celtics clinched the 1961 NBA Finals series with a 121-112 win over the St. Louis Hawks. Boston, which needed five games to beat the Hawks, was led by Bill Russell, who concluded the game with 30 points and 38 rebounds.
  • 1966: Emmett Ashford became the first African American to umpire a major league baseball game – his first contest was held in Washington D.C. Stadium between the Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians. Ashford was spotted at third base.
  • 1975: Hank Aaron played his first home game with the Milwaukee Brewers since September 22, 1965. Aaron was traded back to Milwaukee from the Atlanta Braves in 1974 – he received a phone call on Saturday, November 2, 1974, from the President of the Brewers, Bud Selig.
  • 1976: Raymond Floyd won his only Masters title by beating runner-up Ben Crenshaw by eight strokes.
  • 1992: The Boston Red Sox needed 19 innings to beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-5, in just their third game of the 1992 season. The win – Boston’s first of the season – spoiled Cleveland’s home opener and was highlighted by a two-run home run in the top of the 19th by Tim Naehring.

    Boston would go onto win 73 games in 1992, but finish seventh in the American League East.

  • 2004: Phil Mickelson won his first major championship – the 68th Masters Tournament – with a birdie on the final hole, which helped him edge runner-up Ernie Els.

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