Chris Hogan Thinks Paul Rabil Could Go From PLL To NFL

Chris Hogan, who played ten seasons in the NFL, recently secure a spot on the Cannons Lacrosse Club of the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL). (PHOTO COURTESY: NFL.com)

By Matt Noonan

Chris Hogan made headlines earlier this year when he elected to swap his football pads for a lacrosse stick.

Hogan, who won two Super Bowls with the New England Patriots, secured a spot earlier this month on the Cannons Lacrosse Club of the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL) but did not suit up this weekend. However, he was on the sidelines supporting his teammates this afternoon en route to their first-ever PLL win against the Waterdogs Lacrosse Club while discussing his experience thus far with NBC‘s Paul Burmeister.

One question Burmeister asked was a fun, what-if/hypothetical questions — he wanted to know which of his Cannons teammates was “best suited” to go from the PLL to the National Football League (NFL).

Of course, there are a few that come to mind, but Hogan named Paul Rabil, who is a co-founder of the PLL with his brother Mike Rabil. He described the veteran midfielder as “big, physical, runs hard, (and) probably could play offense or defense.”

“All these guys are good athletes, and I know a lot of them played two sports,” Hogan said to Burmeister. “I mean, I think Paul gave it a second thought there for a little while.”

While it’s unknown if Rabil wanted to play in the NFL, especially earlier this year, he did tell Rich Eisen that Patriots coach Bill Belichick did try to convince him to try out for the team when he was younger.

“We went back and forth — this was when I was 23 and I was the captain of Team USA at the time and we kind of came to an agreement that it was the best decision to stay in lacrosse,” Rabil said during a recent interview on The Rich Eisen Show.

It would have been fun to see Rabil and Hogan compete for the Patriots, especially with Tom Brady, but for now, they can focus on winning a championship later this summer/early fall.

Cannons LC Score First PLL Win, Top Waterdogs, 13-7

Boston Cannons Helmet. (PHOTO CREDIT: Reed Smith’s Photography)

By NoontimeSports.com

Congrats are due to both coach Sean Quirk and the Cannons Lacrosse Club of the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL) as they scored their first-ever win on Sunday against the Waterdogs Lacrosse Club.

Sunday’s victory — a 13-7 win, which was highlighted by Lyle Thompson (four goals) and Andrew Kew (four goals) — took place at Gillette Stadium and was a part of the PLL’s opening weekend for its third season.

In addition to Thompson and Kew, the Cannons received two goals from Paul Rabil while Nick Marrocco earned his first win between the pipes with 11 saves.

The Cannons LC led the Waterdogs by four goals (5-1) after one quarter before securing a 9-2 advantage at halftime. The Waterdogs would outscore the Cannons, 5-4, during the final two sessions, but it was not enough to erase a seven-goal deficit at the break.

An original member of Major League Lacrosse, the Cannons rebranded from the Boston Cannons last December when the MLL merged with the PLL. Boston capped the final season of MLL with a championship win over the Denver Outlaws last July for its second title in franchise history.

For more on the Premier Lacrosse League, HOP HERE!

Podcast: Jamie Gatlin on the Boston Bruins, Pursuing A Career In Sports Media & More

By NoontimeSports.com

On Friday, May 28, 2021, Jamie Gatlin joined Matt Noonan for a brand new Noontime Sports Podcast.

Gatlin, who is an alum of both Emerson College and Suffolk University, began the show discussing the content he creates on the Boston Bruins for Causeway Crowd, which is one of many blogs on FanSided. Additionally, Gatlin and Noonan discuss the first-round series win by the Bruins against the Washington Capitals, as well as the outlook for their upcoming series with the New York Islanders.

In addition to some hockey talk, Gatlin shares why he was interested in becoming a sports journalist — well, more joining a competitive content creation and production world. His writing (and content) has appeared on other platforms, as well, including Prime Time Sports Talk where he has produced stories about minor league baseball players.

The show concludes with Gatlin and Noonan discussing individual player branding and marketing — he is currently assisting TorchPro with social media and content creation on the players they represent.

Listen to the show below, courtesy of our Spotify channel or through Anchor and Apple Podcasts.

Podcast: Lu Robinson-Griggs (MIT Women’s Basketball)

By NoontimeSports.com

On Monday, May 24, 2021, we welcomed Lu Robinson-Griggs to the podcast — Robinson-Griggs was recently named the new head coach of the MIT women’s basketball program.

Robinson-Griggs returns to Cambridge, Massachusetts after spending the past two seasons as the women’s basketball coach at Vassar College. During her first season with the Brewers, she led the team to the Liberty League (LL) championship against Ithaca College. Vassar concluded the 2019-20 campaign with a 19-8 record.

In addition to discussing her time at Vassar, Lu Robinson-Griggs and host/producer Matt Noonan discussed additional topics, including attending the 2020 Basketball Hall of Fame induction, playing and learning from Barbara Stevens at Bentley University, and how she grew as a coach, both as an assistant and associate with MIT, and the head coach at Lesley University.

Listen to our interview below, courtesy of our Spotify channel or through Anchor and Apple Podcasts.

Commentary: Adam Vinatieri Is The NFL’s Best Placekicker Of All-Time

Former New England Patriots kicker Adam Vinatieri announced his retirement from the NFL on Wednesday, May 26, 2021. (PHOTO COURTESY: Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images/ESPN.com)

By Matt Noonan

Tom Brady and Bill Belichick will always be synonymous with the New England Patriots, but the same could be said for Adam Vinatieri, who announced his retirement from the National Football League (NFL) yesterday on The Pat McAfee Show

Vinatieri, like Brady and Belichick, helped the Patriots win their first-ever Super Bowl championship against the St. Louis Rams in 2002 — he clinched the win with a last-second field goal weeks after splitting the uprights twice in a snowy postseason affair with the Oakland Raiders. He would win three more championships over the next five years, including one with the Indianapolis Colts in 2007 (the victory marked the first of two titles for quarterback Peyton Manning, who would win his second Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos in 2016). 

The Yankton, South Dakota native has garnered multiple accolades throughout his career, including a trio of First-Team All-Pro honors along with a spot on three historic rosters: New England Patriots 50th Anniversary Team, NFL 2000s All-Decade Team, and NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team. He is currently the league’s all-time scoring leader (2,673 points) and holds numerous kicking records, including the most consecutive field goals made (44).

So, between his accolades and records, along with his four Super Bowl rings, is it fair to say Vinatieri is the best placekicker in NFL History?

My answer: Yes, he is, but some may disagree and say that Morten Andersen (2,544 all-time points) and Gary Anderson (2,434 all-time points) deserve some consideration as the best placekicker in league history.

Neither Andersen nor Anderson has won a Super Bowl, but they both competed for nearly three decades. Vinatieri kicked extra points and field goals for 24 years.

Andersen was inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 2017 — he is also a member of the New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame and ranks second in the league in games played (382). He converted 565 of 709 field-goal attempts and was close to perfect when it came to extra points (849 out of 859 attempts). Andersen kicked for five teams but spent most of his career with the Saints.

Anderson has yet to be inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame but should hear his name called one of these days especially after tallying 1,343 points with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Four years after he left the Steelers, he enjoyed one of his best seasons with the Minnesota Vikings where he converted every extra point and field goal attempt in the regular season. His streak would conclude in the 1998 NFC Championship Game when he missed a 38-yard field goal late in the fourth quarter. The Atlanta Falcons capitalized on the missed field goal by scoring a game-tying touchdown on the ensuing possession. Morten Andersen would cap the comeback with a game-winning field goal in overtime.

Similar to Andersen, Anderson competed for five teams. He spent most of his career with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1982-1994).

All three kickers enjoyed successful careers, but after a quick stroll down memory lane, I still believe Adam Vinatieri is the best placekicker of all time. Had Morten Andersen won at least one — OK, maybe two Super Bowls, then maybe you could say it is a toss-up. Perhaps he would have earned more postseason honors, as well? But based on statistics and four Super Bowl titles, along with being the all-time scoring leader (as of this afternoon), I think it is fair to say that Vinatieri will always be the NFL’s best placekicker.