On This Date In History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Weekend, everyone!

We hope your Saturday is filled with sunshine (and better weather) compared to earlier this week when we had some rain (and overcast skies).

As usual, we will continue to pump out this post every day with hopes to bring a smile to everyone’s face during this unusual and scary time.

Be well, stay safe, and have a wonderful rest of your morning (and day), everyone!


On This Date in History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020 

  • 1917: Babe Ruth tossed a complete game while recording one run and one hit during four at-bats as the Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees, 10-3, in their season-opener at the Polo Grounds. Ruth retired just one batter of 35 batters he faced while yielding just three runs on three hits to go with three walks. Boston’s Harry Hooper concluded the contest with three runs and three hits.
  • 1961: The Boston Celtics clinched the 1961 NBA Finals series with a 121-112 win over the St. Louis Hawks. Boston, which needed five games to beat the Hawks, was led by Bill Russell, who concluded the game with 30 points and 38 rebounds.
  • 1966: Emmett Ashford became the first African American to umpire a major league baseball game – his first contest was held in Washington D.C. Stadium between the Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians. Ashford was spotted at third base.
  • 1975: Hank Aaron played his first home game with the Milwaukee Brewers since September 22, 1965. Aaron was traded back to Milwaukee from the Atlanta Braves in 1974 – he received a phone call on Saturday, November 2, 1974, from the President of the Brewers, Bud Selig.
  • 1976: Raymond Floyd won his only Masters title by beating runner-up Ben Crenshaw by eight strokes.
  • 1992: The Boston Red Sox needed 19 innings to beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-5, in just their third game of the 1992 season. The win – Boston’s first of the season – spoiled Cleveland’s home opener and was highlighted by a two-run home run in the top of the 19th by Tim Naehring.

    Boston would go onto win 73 games in 1992, but finish seventh in the American League East.

  • 2004: Phil Mickelson won his first major championship – the 68th Masters Tournament – with a birdie on the final hole, which helped him edge runner-up Ernie Els.

On This Date In Sports History: Saturday, April 4th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Saturday, everyone – we hope everyone is doing well and staying safe, of course!

Starting today – and every day going forward! – we are going to hop back in time and share some exciting sports memories for each particular day. And today, our post is all about what happened in the sports world on April 4th, enjoy.


On This Date in History: April 4th

  • 1948: 84-year-old Connie Mack challenged 78-year-old Clark Griffith to a race from home plate to first base. And the end result was a tie.
  • 1974: Hank Aaron tied Babe Ruth‘s home run record (714) against the Cincinnati Reds. Four days later (April 8th, to be exact) he would break the record from 1935, establishing a new mark for home runs with 715.
  • 1986: Wayne Gretzky recorded his 213th point of the 1985-86 season during a 9-3 setback to the Calgary Flames. Gretzky, who would finish the year with 215 points, broke his old record of 212 points in a single0season.
  • 1993: The Texas Tech women’s basketball team captured its initial NCAA Championship with an 84-82 win over Ohio State. Sheryl Swoopes, who was named the Most Outstanding Player, established a single-game championship scoring record of 47 points.
  • 1994: Arkansas‘ men’s basketball team won its first-ever NCAA Championship – the Razorbacks beat the Blue Devils of Duke in the title game.
  • 1997: The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim secured their first-ever postseason berth, which would conclude in the NHL conference semifinals. The Ducks won their first-ever postseason series in the quarterfinals – they outlasted the Phoenix Coyotes in seven games before falling to the Detroit Red Wings in four-straight semifinal contests.
  • 1998: The re-branded NFL Europe, which was originally named the World League of American Football, kicked-off a brand new season The Rhein Fire would be crowned the champions weeks later when they beat the Frankfurt Galaxy in the World Bowl by a score of 34-10.
  • 2011: Coach Jim Calhoun leads the Connecticut men’s basketball team to an NCAA Championship – the Huskies beat Butler, 53-41. Current Boston Celtics guard Kemba Walker scored 16 points for the Huskies.

Daily Noontime: Thursday, April 2nd, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

It’s Thursday – it is also the second day of April, which is somewhat exciting, right?

Sadly, today will be an indoor day due to the rain, but we must ALL stay indoors as much as possible to continue to stop the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Let’s brighten the day (and everyone’s mood) with a brand new ‘Daily Noontime’ – have a wonderful day, everyone!


Noontime’s Headlines for Thursday, April 2nd, 2020 


Noontime’s Latest Post: I wrote a column – well, more a commentary piece on whether the NFL should or should not press the pause button after the NFL Draft. I also shared some thoughts on video, too. 


On this Date in History 

  • 1931: Jackie Mitchell, a 17-year old girl, struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in an exhibition baseball contest at Engel Stadium in Chattanooga, Tennessee.
  • 1984: John Thompson leads Georgetown University to an 84-75 win over Houston in the NCAA Championship game. Thompson becomes the first African-American coach to win a collegiate championship.
  • 2001: New York Yankees pitcher (and former Boston Red Sox hurler, too) Roger Clemens becomes the American League, all-time strikeout leader, recording his 3,509th strikeout in a 7-3 win over the Kansas City Royals.

Noontime’s Sunday Sports Movies

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

It’s a rainy Sunday, which means many of us, including myself, will be searching for a good movie to watch – maybe two (or three)?

And some of us, like myself, may want to watch a sports movie since there are no live games on television due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

So, with many of us searching for a new or old movie to watch this morning or afternoon, here are some suggestions from Noontime Sports, enjoy!

42. Hands down, this is one of my favorite baseball movies. I actually watched this film last weekend – it fills your baseball void, I swear!

Travel back to the late 1940s to learn about Jackie Robinson‘s first season with the Brooklyn Dodgers, which saw the Blue and White win the National League and advance to the 1947 World Series against the New York Yankees.

The Express. Sticking the historical theme – I majored in American Studies, so I love history! – jump back in time with your football and shoulder pads to learn about Ernie Davis, who was the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy.

Davis, who is played by Rob Brown, is recruited to play college football at Syracuse University by both head coach Ben Schwartzwalder (Dennis Quaid) and Jim Brown, who is one of the greatest halfbacks in the National Football League (NFL).

Miracle. So, I am currently reading Mike Eruzione‘s The Making of a Miracle, which means I will probably watch this movie once I finish. And if you are craving some hockey with the National Hockey League (NHL) at a standstill, then consider cheering on the 1980 U.S.A. men’s team, which defeated both the Soviet Union and Finland to win the gold medal at the Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York.

The Replacements. Alright, let’s switch gears from historical movies to a comedy.

Gene Hackman inherits a team of replacements during a professional football strike that needs to win three of its final four contests to reach the playoffs. And for the team to reach the postseason, Hackman will need quarterback Shane Falco, who is played by Keanu Reeves, to guide his offense.

Space Jam. Missing basketball, especially the Boston Celtics, then consider rooting for the Tune Squad, which is made up of some of your favorite Looney Tunes characters, as well as … Michael Jordan.

61*. Director Billy Crystal, who happens to be a die-hard New York Yankees fan, takes you back to 1961 when both Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle begin their respective quests to break Babe Ruth‘s 1927 single-season home run record.

Draft Day. We’re 25 days away from the 2020 NFL Draft, so get ready to celebrate your team’s initial pick by seeing who the Cleveland Browns will select in the 2014 Draft. Kevin Costner, who is the team’s general manager, seems to know his team needs a bit more than newly acquired head coach Denis Leary.

Additional movies to watch:

  • Moneyball (baseball)
  • The Blind Side (football)
  • Invictus (rugby)
  • Glory Road (basketball)
  • Coach Carter (basketball)
  • Million Dollar Baby (boxing)
  • Cinderella Man (boxing)
  • Remember the Titans (football)
  • Slap Shot (hockey)
  • A League of Their Own (baseball)
  • Hoosiers (basketball)
  • Bull Durham (baseball)
  • The Mighty Ducks (hockey)
  • Rudy (football)
  • The Sandlot (baseball)
  • Eight Men Out (baseball)
  • Field of Dreams (baseball)
  • Happy Gilmore (golf)

As always, be well, stay safe, and think optimistically, friends – we will continue to get through this time and we’ll be back soon with some new content! 

Few Thoughts On Clemens Perjury Trial

Did Roger Clemens earn another win for the record book? (Photo Credit: New York Daily News)

By Matt Noonan 

Once Monday’s news was announced about Roger Clemens, it became quite easy to realize that government and sports don’t coincide.

Clemens, who was acquitted of charges toward lying about steroids and human growth hormones to Congress in 2008, was officially sent out of a Washington courtroom as a “free man” on Monday.

And while many are continuing to scratch their heads over this particular case, it certainly emphasizes the fact that an athlete is more powerful than a group of non-baseball fans, ahem…the jury.

Of course, he will certainly be remembered as one of the greatest pitchers to ever play the game.

The Rocket spent 24-years in the big leagues, and walked away with a record of 354-184 on the bump. He appeared in 11 All-Star Games, earned seven Cy Young Awards, paced the American League with the most wins by a flame-thrower in ’86, ’87, ’97, and ’98, and was awarded the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1986.

Yet, excluding those various credentials, it’s unlikely that his name will ever be scratched from the so-called, “steroids era.”

Baseball has become a game of cheaters. Players seem more focused on their various accolades than winning a World Series, and the same could possibly be said for Clemens, right?

Clemens will certainly be remembered as a cheater, as well as someone who maneuvered his way forward with various performance enhancement drugs to extend his career, and one example could be seen when he joined the Toronto Blue Jays for a two-year stint in ’97-’98.

The right-hander hadn’t earned 20 wins or more since the 1980’s, and after a few up-and-down seasons with the Boston Red Sox, Clemens’ numbers skyrocketed in Canada, as he won 41 of 54 games. He also earned two back-to-back Cy Young Awards, too.

So, did the government strike out or did Clemens earn himself another win for the record books?

Well, according to the New York Times, this particular trial was a so-called, “waste of government time, and money.” Clemens became the second Major Leaguer to sneak through the cracks — the first was Barry Bonds, who was sentenced to one month of house arrest after a seven-year investigation in April of 2011. And while Bonds was convicted on one of four charges, (obstructing justice) he still managed to walk out of the courtroom.

Clemens avoided 10 years in federal prison, but will now be faced with the difficult task of convincing the baseball writers that he deserves a spot in the Cooperstown, (he’ll need 75 percent of the ballots to earn a spot).

All in all, I believe that he cheated. Clemens, Bonds and others turned America’s Pastime into a game that’s no longer linked to the days of Ted Williams, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron and others.

Will baseball ever resort back to the “good ole days?”

I’m not sure, but once again, the government failed to send a message to all baseball fans and players that cheating is not allowed in a game and life.