Simply Social Sports (S3) Boston Is Ready To Return To The Field

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Simply Social Sports (S3) Boston is looking forward to playing games this summer. (PHOTO COURTESY: S3 Boston/Jessica Knight)

By Matt Noonan 

As the state of Massachusetts continues to reopen in the midst of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, there is a sense of excitement for sports and recreational activities to return, including adult leagues, which would be permitted during the second phase.

Governor Charlie Baker is expected to share more information today about the second phase, which would allow adult, amateur, and youth sports leagues to return to the playing field.

The second phase is currely scheduled to begin Monday, June 8.

The news of welcoming back adult sports leagues certainly excited Jessica Knight, who is the founder and league coordinator for Simply Social Sports (S3) Boston.

“We are ready to go,” said Knight, who has been in touch with the Boston Parks and Recreation Department about acquiring permits for upcoming leagues. “(We are) just waiting for the go-ahead.”

Knight says S3 Boston will not be running any leagues until July but does hope to provide a few pickup games for its players in the coming weeks.

As of now, S3 Boston is expected to offer six leagues this summer, beginning as soon as Tuesday, July 7. Four of the six leagues will be softball, while the other two will be beach volleyball at Carson Beach and kickball at Teddy Eberson Field.

Noontime Sports recently caught-up with Jessica Knight to discuss how S3 Boston has stayed in touch with its players virtually these past few months, as well as what she expects leagues to look like once they can officially begin in a few weeks.


Since the pandemic started, how has S3 been able to stay connected with its players? Have you held virtual games or trivia events? 

Yes. S3 Boston began as a social league and our goal was to continue this model throughout the pandemic. We have run weekly happy hours every Friday, as well as hosted some virtual events, including a running group, trivia, and music bingo. We have also shared daily workouts for our players.

Do you imagine your leagues and rules will have to be adjusted due to social distancing and safety measures? Additionally, do you think it is possible to offer some go-to/favorite sports but organize them differently? 

Yes, we will need to incorporate rules around what equipment is shared, what is not shared, social distancing, and face coverings. I have been trying to think through a way to host Cornhole in a safe way – sure, it might be hard to stand six feet apart from each other while using gloves, but I think it is possible.

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Simply Social Sports (S3) Boston will offer four softball leagues this summer. (PHOTO COURTESY: S3 Boston/Jessica Knight)

What sport (or leagues) do you think will be in high demand for your athletes this summer? And do you envision most leagues will be held outside? 

This summer will be all outside. I am hopeful to get back indoors in the fall. I think softball and kickball are going to be in the highest demand. Everyone just wants to get back out there.

Obviously, safety and health will be the main focus when it comes to restarting and running leagues, so what should players expect after signing up to arriving to the field for their first game? 

As of right now, we anticipate everyone will need to wear a mask and participate in social distancing as much as possible. We will be cleaning the supplies after each game and using a fresh ball for each contest. If someone falls sick, we will be offering them a prorated refund for the league to eliminate any pressure to show up.

Finally, does S3 Boston have leagues scheduled to start either later this month/early July? 

Yes, they are all up on our website. We will be adding more soon as soon as we receive the permits from the parks department.


To learn more about Simply Social Sports (S3) Boston, visit their website, as well as follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

Sports Will Return Under Phase Two Of Massachusetts Reopening

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By NoontimeSports.com 

The amateur, adult, and youth sports world received some good news today from the state of Massachusetts.

As announced earlier today during Governor Charlie Baker‘s press breifing, sports will be able to return in some capacity during the second phase of the state’s reopening.

The second phase of the Massachusetts reopening plan is scheduled for Monday, June 8.

“Today, we are releasing guidance and workplace safety standards for these outdoor adult sports, youth sports, and summer sports camps,” said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito during Wednesday’s briefing with the media. “This guidance includes guidelines for facility opperators, as well as activity organizers.

“As part of phase two, outdoor athletic facilities can be open for organized youth and adult sports activities in accordance with the guidance. Games, scrimmages, and tournaments are currently not permitted for any organized sports activities and contact sports must limit activities to no contact drills and practices.”

In addition to outdoor activities, the state has outlined plans for restrictions for indoor facilities “to supervised sports programs and sports campus for youths under the age of 18.”

Gov. Baker announced last week that the state’s professional sports teams would be able to hold practices, beginning Saturday, June 6. That is the same date both Baker and his administration are planning to provide Massachusetts residents with additional information on the second phase.

Wednesday’s announcement, along with the executive order Gov. Baker outlined earlier this week should be viewed as a positive step – a small one, of course – with restarting athletic events. It does not mean, however, that games and events can resume as they once did a few months ago.

Gov. Baker Paves The Way For Pro Sports To Return To Massachusetts

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Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker provided a glimmer of hope for live sports to return in the coming weeks. (PHOTO COURTESY: Matt Noonan/NoontimeSports.com)

By Matt Noonan 

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker clearly misses sports – we all know he is a proud supporter of our state’s hometown teams.

So on Friday, Baker announced that the state’s professional teams would be allowed to begin practicing as soon as Saturday, June 6. That is also the same date Massachusetts residents should learn more about the second phase of the state’s reopening plan, which would begin Monday, June 8.

“I know we still aren’t to the point where we’ll have our pro sports teams back playing anything yet,” Baker said during Friday’s press briefing. “The leagues are obviously working hard to host games again. And I think we all hope that at some point, opening practice facilities will help make that happen a little sooner.”

Professional sports have been idle since mid-March when the National Basketball Association (NBA) and National Hockey League (NHL) paused their respective seasons due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Since then, both leagues have been working diligently to find a way to restart their seasons safely in “hub cities.”

Major League Baseball (MLB) delayed the start of its 2020 season but continues to be stuck in neutral due to ongoing contract discussions between the players and owners.

Both Major League Soccer (MLS) and the National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL) have announced plans to return to the pitch in the coming weeks, which should excited local New England Revolution fans.

Baker believes live sports would certainly help all of us during this unprecedented time. Additionally, it would be a great outlet for many, who have been consuming older contests these past few weeks, including a 2007 playoff run by the Boston Red Sox on NESN.

“I think for all of us live sports, and especially pro sports would be a great thing to see again because not only will it be a significant milestone for those of us who are fans but it will also send a big signal that we’ve continued to do all the things that we need to do to contain and control the virus,” said Baker.

Summer Baseball Remains A Possibility For The Intercity Baseball League (ICL)

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David Lightbody and the Alibrandis Baseball Club have competed in the Intercity Baseball League (ICL) since 2018. (PHOTO COURTESY:

By Matt Noonan 

There’s hope for the Intercity Baseball League (ICL) to play some games this summer.

The ICL Board of Directors announced Wednesday, May 27 that it’s possible an abbreviated season could begin no earlier than Monday, July 6, pending both the first and second phases of the Massachusetts reopening plan goes “as currently proposed.”

Gov. Charlie Baker unveiled the state’s reopening plan earlier this month which consisted of four phases. A new phase can begin every three weeks, but Baker and his staff have stressed that data will be the key with the reopening, so it is possible the first and second phases could be extended longer.

The ICL, which has provided its eight-team league with updates for the past few weeks, continued to stress safety as its main concern.

Pending a season does begin on Monday, July 6, the league’s regular-season schedule would feature fewer games, along with a double-elimination tournament instead of its usual postseason format, which consists of six teams.

The ICL Board of Directors will reconvene via Zoom for its next meeting on Tuesday, June 9 with hopes of more news for its teams, as well as its fans and spectators.

While Wednesday’s news should provide hope and optimism for those seeking some baseball to watch, a few other leagues are hoping to make a triumphant return to the diamond in the coming weeks.  Some leagues, including the Cape Cod Baseball League and New England Collegiate Baseball League, have canceled their respective seasons, while the Futures Collegiate Baseball League delayed the start of its season.

Summer Baseball Hopes Remain Alive For Some Massachusetts Leagues

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Summer baseball in Massachusetts could still happen for a few local leagues. (PHOTO COURTESY: VisualHunt.com)

By Matt Noonan

There’s hope for summer baseball in Massachusetts. But will games be played remains the biggest question?

The Intercity Baseball League (ICL) has yet to cancel its 2020 season but did share an update on Thursday that “safety of players, coaches, umpires, team officials, and fans” remains its biggest concern. It is possible a season could begin in July with a double-elimination tournament that would be followed by the playoffs, according to the board of directors’ recent post on the ICL website.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker unveiled a plan for the state’s reopening earlier this week, which did include outdoor activities and recreation, so it is possible the ICL could return in the third phase. But for the ICL to be able to play, they would need to obtain permits from the various cities and towns their teams compete in.

The ICL is an eight-team league and has been playing baseball games since 1950.

The Yawkey Baseball League (YBL) has yet to cancel its 2020 season, according to a recent update that was shared on TwitterDave McKay, who is the league’s president, expressed optimism for games to be played this summer but did say the YBL is “awaiting news on when permits will be issued.”

An update on the YBL’s 2020 season will be announced in two weeks.

In a Facebook post from last month, the Boston Park League announced they plan to provide its teams with a 21-game schedule, beginning Monday, July 6. The post also noted their 2020 season is “subject to guidelines from (Gov. Baker) and the City of Boston. No news from the BPL has been shared since last month.

The Cranberry League has not changed its plans to begin its season, as reported earlier this month. The league plans to play its season-opener on Sunday, June 21st, but most likely the start date would be pushed back due to the state’s phase reopening plan, which is in three-week increments.

Finally, Lou Thompkins All-Star Baseball plans to provide its three youth divisions with a 15-game schedule, beginning after July 4. One of the leagues has decided to allow local high school seniors to play due to their spring seasons being canceled by the coronavirus (COVID-19).