Daily Noontime: Monday, June 29, 2020

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By Matt Noonan 

It’s Monday – yay!

Yet, what just happened to the weekend? Can we get some more sleep?

Luckily, this won’t be a bad week because we will be celebrating the Fourth of July, beginning Friday, July 3.

Let’s kick-off the week with a brand new ‘Daily Noontime’ – as always, make sure to smile, laugh, and be kind to others!


Noontime’s Headlines for Monday, June 29, 2020

  • News broke around 7 or 8 p.m. (eastern time) last night about the New England Patriots signing quarterback Cam Newton to a one-year deal.

    Newton joins a Patriots team that is transitioning from Tom Brady, who departed the area to quarterback the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

    But will the signing of Newton help the Patriots save its ongoing dynasty, which began during the first decade of the new millennium? Let’s hope so!

  • Mike Reiss of ESPN.com believes the Cam Newton signing is “a no-lose situation” for the Patriots, who currently have two quarterbacks on their roster, including Jarrett Stidham, who some believed would be the starting signal-caller this season.
  • So, with Cam Newton joining the Patriots, what does this mean for Jarrett Stidham? Will he be the starter or back-up to the veteran signal-caller? Only time will tell, right?
  • In addition to welcoming Cam Newton to Massachusetts on Sunday evening, the Patriots also made headlines for violating league rules last season for filming the Cincinnati Bengals‘ sidelines when they played the Cleveland Browns.

    As noted on ProFootballTalk.com, the Patriots have been fined $1.1 million dollars and have lost a third-round draft pick.

  • According to Colin Cowherd, who can be heard (and seen) on FS1, there are only four “top college football programs” in the good ole United States of America. Which ones are they?
  • And finally, Brooklyn Nets forward Wilson Chandler announced he will not be headed to Orlando, Florida once his team’s season resumes next month.

    Chandler cited “health concerns” for his decision to not join his team, which has won 30 games this season.

Remember to stay connected with Noontime Sports on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube

New England Small Colleges In The NFL & AFL Draft

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Bates College fullback Tom Carr, who is one of two Bobcats to rush for 30 touchdowns in a career, was drafted by the Boston Patriots in 1966. (PHOTO COURTESY: Bates College.)

By NoontimeSports.com 

The 2020 NFL Draft is just a few hours away – are you excited?

While we anxiously await to hear who will be this year’s first-round pick – most likely Joe Burrow, right? – we wanted to highlight some former New England small college players that heard their names announced during past NFL and American Football League (AFL) Drafts.

Our list was created with the help of ProFootballReference.com’s NFL and AFL Draft History.


American International College (AIC)

  • 1944: Myron Majewski (Tackle): Majewski was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 328th pick in the 32nd round.
  • 1953: Bill Murray (End): Murray was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 272nd pick in the 23rd round.
  • 1957: Tom Rychlec (End): Rychlec was selected by the Detroit Lions with the 119th pick in the 10th round. The Meriden, Connecticut native played one season with the Lions before competing for the Buffalo Bills of the American Football League (AFL)from 1960 to 1963.
  • 1961: Joe Scibelli (G): Scibelli was drafted by two teams – the New York Titans of the AFL and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL. He elected to play for the Rams and played for Los Angeles from 1961 to 1975. He started 195 of 202 games on defense. The Springfield, Massachusetts native competed in six postseason contests.
  • 1961: Andy Griffith (RB): Griffith was drafted by the New York Titans of the American Football League with the 198th pick in the 25th round.
  • 1967: Bill Delaney (TE): Delaney was selected by the Atlanta Falcons with the 112th pick in the fifth round.
  • 1970: Glen Dumont (RB): Dumont was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs with the 364th pick in the 14th round.
  • 1972: Bruce Laird (DB): Laird was drafted by the Baltimore Colts with the 152nd pick in the sixth round. The Lowell, Massachusetts native played ten seasons in the NFL – eight with the Colts and two with the San Diego Chargers. He started in 127 of 164 contests while competing in five postseason games.
  • 1977: Terry Randolph (DB): Randolph was drafted by the Green Bay Packers with the 290th pick in the 11th round.
  • 1992: Gabe Mokwuah (LB): Mokwuah was drafted by the Green Pack Packers with the 287th pick in the 11th round.

Amherst College 

  • 1972: Jean Fugett (TE): Figett was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys with the 338th pick in the 13th round. The Baltimore, Maryland native played eight seasons in the NFL – he played four seasons with the Cowboys (1972-1975) before finishing his career with the Washington Redskins.
  • 1974: Freddie Scott (WR): Scott was selected by the Baltimore Colts with the 174th pick in the seventh round. The Grandy, Arkansas native played 10 seasons in the NFL – he spent the majority of his career with the Detroit Lions (1978-1983) while competing in four postseason contests. He never won a playoff game.
  • 1978: Bill Swiacki (TE): Swiacki was drafted by the New York Giants with the 232nd pick in the ninth round.
  • 1978: Sean Clancy (LB): Clancy was drafted by the Miami Dolphins with the 217th pick in the eighth round. The Manhasset, New York native played two seasons in the NFL – he spent one year with the Dolphins and his final season with the St. Louis Cardinals. He also competed in just one postseason contest.

Bates College

Bentley University

  • 2008: Mackenzy Bernadeau (G): Bernadeua was selected by the Carolina Panthers with the 250th pick in the seventh round. The Waltham, Massachusetts native played seven seasons, including four with the Dallas Cowboys from 2012 to 2015. He started 49 of 111 games, including all 16 for the Cowboys in 2012. He also played in two postseason games with the Cowboys in 2015 against the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers.

Bowdoin College

  • 1966: Paul Soule (HB): Soule, who was from Portland, Maine, was drafted by the Boston Patriots in the 1966 AFL Draft with 174th pick in the 20th round.
  • 1978: Steve McCabe (G): McCabe, who grew up in Westborough, Massachusetts, was drafted the Washington Redskins with the 324th pick in the 12th round. McCabe is the only member of the Polar Bears football program to be drafted by an NFL team after becoming the school’s first and only student-athlete to earn Kodak Division III All-American honors.

Brandeis University  

Colby College 

  • 1955: John Jacobs (E): Jacobs was selected by the New York Giants with the 224th pick in the 19th round.
  • 1959: Bob Sargent (T): Sargent was drafted by the Washington Redskins with the 292nd pick in the 25th round.

Middlebury College

  • 1949: John Corbisiero (B): Corbisiero was selected by the Chicago Bears with the 169th pick in the 17th round.
  • 1955: Al Dennis (E): Dennis was drafted by the Chicago Cardinals with the 191st pick in the 16th round.
  • 1958: Dick Fusco (T): Fusco was drafted by the New York Giants with the 214th pick in the 18th round.

Norwich University

  • 1943: Walt Domina (HB): Domina was selected by the New York Giants with the 106th pick in the 12th round. A two-spot athlete with the Cadets, Domina was remembered for his impressive play on the gridiron – he still holds individual records for points (31) and most touchdowns scored (five) in a single-game. Both records were recorded against Middlebury in 1940.

Southern Connecticut State University

  • 1963: Ralph Ferrisi (RB): Ferrisi was drafted by two teams – Boston Patriots and Minnesota Vikings. Ferrisi, who was born in Bronx, New York, but graduated from Weymouth High School, played professionally for the Vikings.
  • 1967: Tom Reale (OT): Reale was selected by the New York Giants with the 369th pick in the 15th round.
  • 1967: Dick Nocera (RB): Nocera was selected by the Boston Patriots with the 414th pick in the 16th round of the AFL Draft.
  • 1985: Travis Tucker (TE): Tucker was picked 287th overall in the 11th round by the Cleveland Browns. The Brooklyn, New York native played three seasons for the Browns while competing in a trio of postseason contests.
  • 1987: Scott Mersereau (DT): Mersereau was selected 136th overall in the fifth round by the Los Angeles Rams. The Riverhead, New York native never played for the Rams, however, but competed for the New York Jets from 1987 to 1993. He started in 91 of 102 contests and finished his career with three interceptions and three forced fumbles. He only played in one postseason contest in 1991 against the Houston Oilers.

St. Anselm College

  • 1940: Ray McLean (HB): McLean was drafted by the Chicago Bears with the 192nd pick in the 21st round. The Lowell, Massachusetts native played eight seasons with the Bears, making seven starts in 76 contests. He rushed for five scores while catching 21 touchdowns.

Trinity College

  • 1937: Mickey Kobrosky (QB): Kobrosky was drafted by the New York Giants with the 44th pick in the fifth round. The Springfield, Massachusetts native played seven games for the Giants in 1937, completing 2 of 13 passes for 18 yards while rushing for 41 yards on 13 carries.
  • 1959: Roger LeClerc (LB): LeClerc was drafted by the Chicago Bears with the 177th pick in the 15th round. The Springfield, Massachusetts native was transformed into a kicker with the Bears where he connected on 76 of 152 attempts while drilling 154 of 160 extra points. He did play one season for the Denver Broncos in 1967 before retiring.
  • 1985: Joe Shield (QB): Shielf was selected by the New York Giants with the 44th pick in the fifth round. The Brattleboro, Vermont native played just three games with the Packers during the 1986 season.

Tufts University 

  • 1946: George Feldman (HB): Feldman was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 208th pick in the 22nd round.
  • 1958: George Kurker (T): Kurker was selected by the New York Giants with the 149th pick in the 13th round.
  • 1977: Daryl Brown (DB): Brown was picked 240th in the ninth round by the Cleveland Browns.

UMass Boston

  • 1974: Erle Garrett (DB): The only student-athlete to be drafted in UMass Boston’s history, Garrett was selected by the Minnesota Vikings with the 441st pick in the 17th round.

University of New Haven

  • 1958: Lou Pitney (C): Pitney was drafted by the New York Giants with the 345th pick in the 29th round.
  • 1959: Dick Splain (T): Splain was selected by the Washington Redskins with the 185th pick in the 16th round.
  • 1982: Mile McPherson (DB): McPherson was selected by the Los Angeles Rams with the 256th pick in the 10th round. The Queens, New York native never played a down for the Rams but did play four seasons for the San Diego Chargers while playing in two postseason games against the Miami Dolphins and Pittsburgh Steelers.
  • 1991: Harry Boatswain (G): Boatswain was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers with the 137th pick in the fifth round. The Brooklyn, New York native played began his five-year career with the 49ers before competing for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1995 and the New York Jets in 1996. He also competed in seven postseason games, including four contests against the Dallas Cowboys.

Wesleyan University 

  • 1947: Burt VanderClute (G): Vander Clute was picked 69th overall in the ninth round by the Pittsburgh Steelers.
  • 1947: Jack Medd (C): Medd was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers with the 89th pick in the 11th round.
  • 1948: Jim Burton (E): Burton was drafted by the Boston Yanks with the 69th pick in the ninth round.
  • 1949: John Geary (T): Geary was selected by the New York Bulldogs with the 93rd pick in the 10th round.

Williams College

  • 1970: Jack Maitland (RB): Maitland was selected by the Baltimore Colts with the 408th pick in the 16th round. The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania native played just one season for the Colts, starting two of the 14 games. He rushed for 209 yards on 74 carries for one score while catching nine passes for 67 yards and one touchdown. One year later, Maitland suited up for the New England Patriots where he played for the hometown team in 1971 and 1972.
  • 1976: Scott Perry (DB): Perry was picked 147th overall in the fifth round by the Cincinnati Bengals. The Pleasanton, California native played four seasons with the Bengals before ending his career with both the San Diego Chargers and San Francisco 49ers. Perry played in two postseason games in 1981 with the Chargers.
  • 1996: Ethan Brooks (T): Brooks was selected 229th overall in the seventh round by the Atlanta Falcons. Brooks played seven seasons of professional football, including three with the Baltimore Ravens from 2002-04.

 

On This Date In History: Tuesday, April 21st, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com 

Welcome to Tuesday, everyone – how is everyone doing?

The sun is shining (currently) but we do have some rain on the way so make sure to get some Vitamin D before the clouds arrive. And make sure to smile, too – smiling is important during unprecedented times.

Let’s have another great day by taking another trip down memory lane with a brand new ‘On This Date in History’ from your friends here at Noontime Sports!


On This Date in History: April 21st, 2020

  • 1995: The Boston Celtics played their final regular-season contest at the original (and old) Boston Garden – sadly, the Green and White lost to the New York Knicks by a score of 99-92.
  • 1996: The Chicago Bulls defeated the Washington Bullets, 103-93, to conclude the 1995-96 regular season with a 72-10 overall record. Chicago would go onto win an NBA championship later that spring against the Seattle SuperSonics.
  • 2001: The Atlanta Falcons selected quarterback Michael Vick with the first pick in the 2001 NFL Draft. The Arizona Cardinals selected guard Leonard Davis with the second pick, while the Cleveland Browns picked defensive tackle Gerard Warren with the third pick.

    Richard Seymour was selected sixth by the New England Patriots before the team snagged Matt Light in the second round.

  • 2018: Oakland A’s pitcher Sean Manaea no-hits the Boston Red Sox while retiring 10 batters in nine innings. Oakland beat Boston, 3-0, thanks to Marcus Semien, who concluded the early season contest with three runs, two hits, and one RBI. Boston’s Chris Sale suffered his first loss of the season – the lefthander recorded 10 strikeouts but did yield three runs on six hits.

On This Date In History: Friday, April 17th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation

Welcome to Friday – we made it!

Hopefully, everyone is having a wonderful start to their morning (or afternoon or whenever you will be reading this) and looking forward to some snow in the forecast. Yes, snow will be arriving overnight here in Massachusetts, but luckily warmer weather will follow, which means better days are ahead, right?

In the meantime, take a work break or a reading break to enjoy a brand new ‘On This Date in History’ from your friends at NoontimeSports.com.


On This Date in History: April 17th, 2020 

1947: Jackie Robinson recorded his first major league hit with a bunt going toward third base. Robinson started the game at first base and batted second in the lineup for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Brooklyn won the game by defeating the Boston Braves, 12-6.

1951: Mickey Mantle made his major league debut with the New York Yankees and finished his team’s initial contest of the 1951 season with one RBI, one hit, and one run. New York won its opening day clash against the Boston Red Sox by a score of 5-0 and would go onto win the World Series months later against the New York Giants.

1972: Olavi Suomalainen won the 76th running of the Boston Marathon by finishing the 26.2-mile course in 2:15:39. Victor Manuel Mora finished second with a time of 2:15:57 while Jacinto Sabinal placed third with a time of 2:16:10.

Nina Kuscsik won the women’s race with a time of 3:10:26 while Elaine Pedersen finished second (3:20:25) and Kathrine Switzer placed third (3:29:51).

1987: Julius Erving, who was commonly known as Dr. J to many basketball fans, joined a pair of NBA greats (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (38,387) and Wilt Chamberlain (31,419)) by reaching 30,000 points in a 115-111 setback to the Indiana Pacers. Erving, who netted 38 points in the setback to the Pacers on 17 of 31 shooting, would conclude his career with 30,026 points.

Erving spent his entire NBA career competing for the Philadelphia 76ers but did begin competing professionally in the ABA with the Virginia Squires and New York Nets.

1999: With the first pick in the NFL Draft, the Cleveland Browns selected Tim Couch, a quarterback that competed for Kentucky.

The Philadelphia Eagles, which had the second pick, selected Donovan McNabb from Syracuse while the Cincinnati Bengals selected Akili Smith, who played quarterback for Oregon. 

The New England Patriots selected center Damien Woody, who played locally at Boston College with the 17th pick.

Noontime’s Sunday Sports Movies

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

It’s a rainy Sunday, which means many of us, including myself, will be searching for a good movie to watch – maybe two (or three)?

And some of us, like myself, may want to watch a sports movie since there are no live games on television due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

So, with many of us searching for a new or old movie to watch this morning or afternoon, here are some suggestions from Noontime Sports, enjoy!

42. Hands down, this is one of my favorite baseball movies. I actually watched this film last weekend – it fills your baseball void, I swear!

Travel back to the late 1940s to learn about Jackie Robinson‘s first season with the Brooklyn Dodgers, which saw the Blue and White win the National League and advance to the 1947 World Series against the New York Yankees.

The Express. Sticking the historical theme – I majored in American Studies, so I love history! – jump back in time with your football and shoulder pads to learn about Ernie Davis, who was the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy.

Davis, who is played by Rob Brown, is recruited to play college football at Syracuse University by both head coach Ben Schwartzwalder (Dennis Quaid) and Jim Brown, who is one of the greatest halfbacks in the National Football League (NFL).

Miracle. So, I am currently reading Mike Eruzione‘s The Making of a Miracle, which means I will probably watch this movie once I finish. And if you are craving some hockey with the National Hockey League (NHL) at a standstill, then consider cheering on the 1980 U.S.A. men’s team, which defeated both the Soviet Union and Finland to win the gold medal at the Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York.

The Replacements. Alright, let’s switch gears from historical movies to a comedy.

Gene Hackman inherits a team of replacements during a professional football strike that needs to win three of its final four contests to reach the playoffs. And for the team to reach the postseason, Hackman will need quarterback Shane Falco, who is played by Keanu Reeves, to guide his offense.

Space Jam. Missing basketball, especially the Boston Celtics, then consider rooting for the Tune Squad, which is made up of some of your favorite Looney Tunes characters, as well as … Michael Jordan.

61*. Director Billy Crystal, who happens to be a die-hard New York Yankees fan, takes you back to 1961 when both Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle begin their respective quests to break Babe Ruth‘s 1927 single-season home run record.

Draft Day. We’re 25 days away from the 2020 NFL Draft, so get ready to celebrate your team’s initial pick by seeing who the Cleveland Browns will select in the 2014 Draft. Kevin Costner, who is the team’s general manager, seems to know his team needs a bit more than newly acquired head coach Denis Leary.

Additional movies to watch:

  • Moneyball (baseball)
  • The Blind Side (football)
  • Invictus (rugby)
  • Glory Road (basketball)
  • Coach Carter (basketball)
  • Million Dollar Baby (boxing)
  • Cinderella Man (boxing)
  • Remember the Titans (football)
  • Slap Shot (hockey)
  • A League of Their Own (baseball)
  • Hoosiers (basketball)
  • Bull Durham (baseball)
  • The Mighty Ducks (hockey)
  • Rudy (football)
  • The Sandlot (baseball)
  • Eight Men Out (baseball)
  • Field of Dreams (baseball)
  • Happy Gilmore (golf)

As always, be well, stay safe, and think optimistically, friends – we will continue to get through this time and we’ll be back soon with some new content!