Noontime’s Top 10 New England College Football Rivalries

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By NoontimeSports.com 

There is nothing better than a rivalry, especially on the gridiron. And we have quite a few here in New England, but which one is the best?

Well, we think this list features the best rivalries – 10 to be exact – but if you feel we missed a game (or two), let us know by leaving a comment below. All ideas are welcome!

1. Harvard University vs. Yale University: Hands down, this is the best New England college football rivalry. And while some may think Amherst-Williams belongs in this spot, Harvard-Yale is just as important as The Biggest Little Game in America. The Bulldogs needed two extra sessions this past year to edge the Crimson, 50-43, to claim the 136th edition of The Game. Harvard captured the 2018 meeting, which was played at Fenway Park.

2. Amherst College vs. Williams College: As mentioned above, Harvard-Yale, Amherst-Williams are the two of the best rivalries in New England, but there is nothing better than being in the stands in Amherst or Williamstown in early November to watch this game. The Ephs won their last meeting against the Mammoths by a score of 31-9 and finished their 2019 campaign with their best record under head coach Mark Raymond.

3. Bentley University vs. Stonehill College: The 35th meeting between these two programs was an instant classic. Taking place last October, Falcons won the game on a last-second 32-yard field goal by Grant Buchanan. The win was the Falcons’ second-straight against the Skyhawks, as well as their first against their rival in Easton, Massachusetts since 2011.

4. Maine vs. New Hampshire: The Black Bears may have won the first-ever meeting between these two programs, but the Wildcats have been rather successful since that initial games, especially these past few years. New Hampshire beat Maine twice in the last three seasons, including last fall in their season finale. The winner of each matchup claims the Brice-Cowell Musket, which is named after the former head coaches of the two programs.

5. The Colby-Bates-Bowdoin Trophy (CBB): Since 1892, Bates CollegeBowdoin College, and Colby College have been playing football against each other. And believe it or not, but Bowdoin and Colby have competed against each other 131 times with the Mules winning their most recent meeting with the Polar Bears last November. The win provided Colby with its second-straight CBB title after Bates claimed the crown from 2014-2017. Bowdoin last won the trophy in 2010 when they beat Colby in the final game of the season by a score of 26-21.

6. Coast Guard Academy vs. Norwich University: “The Little Army-Navy Game” is always a must-see, must-watch affair in September, October, or November. The two teams, who entered their previous meeting with identical 2-0 records, first met in 1929. The winner claims “The Mug,” which was donated by The Day with the first award being presented at the conclusion of the third meeting in 1931. Coast Guard currently leads the all-time series, but the Cadets won the most recent contest last September, thanks to an impressive second-half comeback.

7. Dartmouth College vs. New Hampshire: This may not be the most well-known rivalry to current football fans (and players), but the Big Green and Wildcats have met quite a few times over the past few decades. In fact, the first-ever meeting between Dartmouth and New Hampshire occurred in 1901 with the Green and White claiming a 51-0 victory. The two teams last met in 2016 but will meet again in 2021.

8. MIT-WPI: Sure, WPI’s longstanding rivalry may be RPI, but from an in-state (or in-region) opponent, it has to be MIT, right? The Engineers of Cambridge won the first six meetings – both MIT and WPI initially met in 1888 – but since 2001, the Engineers of Worcester have won six of seven contests. The two teams began playing against each other every year since 2015. Last fall, MIT snapped WPI’s six-game winning streak by securing a hard-fought win in double-overtime. The victory was MIT’s first against WPI since 1900.

9. Endicott College vs. Western New England: This always seems to be a must-see, must-follow contest, no matter the records. But for the past few years, this has been the de-facto conference championship game. The Golden Bears have won two of the last three meetings while Endicott captured the 2018 meeting. The win over WNE in 2018 provided Endicott with its sixth victory at home against its rival while snapping the Golden Bears’ 25-game conference winning streak.

10. Southern Connecticut vs. University of New Haven: The Elm City Trophy has resided in New Haven these past few seasons, but the Owls did make things interesting last October. The Chargers have won 24 of the 31 meetings in this series and will attempt to continue its recent momentum against the Owls when they visit West Haven, Connecticut later this year.

Noontime’s Senior Salute: Caty Flagg (UMass Boston)

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By NoontimeSports.com 

For Caty Flagg, this past season was all about enjoying the moment, while making memories of both home and away contests.

The Methuen, Massachusetts native, who played goalie for the UMass Boston women’s ice hockey team, says her goal was to not just “live in the moment,” but cherish time with her friends and teammates.

“I’ll always remember the fun times we had throughout this past season,” said Flagg, who started 25 of 26 games for the Beacons this past winter. “I’ll remember our team practices, lifts, and preseasons, but most importantly, our team dinners to hanging out (off the ice with everyone) while enjoying each other’s company.”

With Flagg between the pipes, the Beacons won 12 games while making an appearance in the New England Hockey Conference (NEHC) playoffs. UMass Boston won eight conference games while capturing seven of 12 road contests.

Flagg, who backstopped Austin Prep to a state championship in 2016, became the Beacons’ first-ever netminder to be named the goaltender of the year by the NEHC in February. The senior goalie earned first-team honors, as well, and finished the season second in the conference in goals-against average (1.84) and save percentage (.942). She posted career-bests in wins (12), winning percentage (.519), and saves (800).

Prior to her team’s postseason clash with the University of Southern Maine, Flagg helped the Beacons beat Colby College, 2-1, behind 45 saves. The win over the Mules was the Beacons’ first against a nationally ranked opponent since 2016 when UMass Boston edged Norwich University in the NEHC Championship.

We recently spoke with Caty Flagg about competing for the UMass Boston women’s ice hockey team, as well as her plans beyond graduation this spring.


Was there a game (or two) that you will remember most from either your senior or junior season with the Beacons? If so, which game(s) are they? 

I have two memorable games. One from last season and one from this season.

Last year, we were the seventh-seed in the NECH playoffs and drew second-seed Suffolk University in the quarterfinals. We had tied and lost to Suffolk earlier in the season but for this particular game, we came in with some confidence that helped us beat them by one goal (2-1). The energy everyone exerted on this particular day was unbelievable and it was definitely one of the most exciting games I’ve ever played in.

Another memorable game was earlier this year against Colby. At the time, Colby was undefeated and ranked tenth in the country. We knew before the game that we were the underdogs, so we went in with the mindset that we had nothing to lose. And we won the game, too. It was unbelievable.

What have you enjoyed most about competing for the UMass Boston women’s ice hockey program these past two years? What will you miss most after graduation? 

I would have to say, my teammates. Waking up every day and going to lifts or practices with them before a long day of classes, but everyone was always there for each other, both on and off the ice.

I am going to miss waking up every day and getting to play the game I love. It was always the best way to start off my day. I have been playing hockey since I was younger and it is going to be different not lacing up the skates each morning in the winter. I do look forward to staying in touch with my teammates, who have become great friends and will be back next year to cheer them on from the stands. 

Tell me about your major. How did you choose it and what do you plan to do with it after graduation? 

I’m an exercise and health sciences major so I am thinking of becoming a personal trainer after graduation.

I became interested in this subject when I attended the University of New England as a freshman and sophomore. I was able to apply what I had learned at UNE when I arrived at UMass Boston as a junior last school year.

Due to COVID-19, my summer internship with a local gym has been shifted to online courses, but I have been able to create in-home workouts, along with a health and wellness program for someone in my family, which keeps me motivated.

This particular time has allowed me to identify what I truly want to do and that is personal training as well as some coaching.

New England Small Colleges In The NFL & AFL Draft

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Bates College fullback Tom Carr, who is one of two Bobcats to rush for 30 touchdowns in a career, was drafted by the Boston Patriots in 1966. (PHOTO COURTESY: Bates College.)

By NoontimeSports.com 

The 2020 NFL Draft is just a few hours away – are you excited?

While we anxiously await to hear who will be this year’s first-round pick – most likely Joe Burrow, right? – we wanted to highlight some former New England small college players that heard their names announced during past NFL and American Football League (AFL) Drafts.

Our list was created with the help of ProFootballReference.com’s NFL and AFL Draft History.


American International College (AIC)

  • 1944: Myron Majewski (Tackle): Majewski was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 328th pick in the 32nd round.
  • 1953: Bill Murray (End): Murray was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 272nd pick in the 23rd round.
  • 1957: Tom Rychlec (End): Rychlec was selected by the Detroit Lions with the 119th pick in the 10th round. The Meriden, Connecticut native played one season with the Lions before competing for the Buffalo Bills of the American Football League (AFL)from 1960 to 1963.
  • 1961: Joe Scibelli (G): Scibelli was drafted by two teams – the New York Titans of the AFL and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL. He elected to play for the Rams and played for Los Angeles from 1961 to 1975. He started 195 of 202 games on defense. The Springfield, Massachusetts native competed in six postseason contests.
  • 1961: Andy Griffith (RB): Griffith was drafted by the New York Titans of the American Football League with the 198th pick in the 25th round.
  • 1967: Bill Delaney (TE): Delaney was selected by the Atlanta Falcons with the 112th pick in the fifth round.
  • 1970: Glen Dumont (RB): Dumont was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs with the 364th pick in the 14th round.
  • 1972: Bruce Laird (DB): Laird was drafted by the Baltimore Colts with the 152nd pick in the sixth round. The Lowell, Massachusetts native played ten seasons in the NFL – eight with the Colts and two with the San Diego Chargers. He started in 127 of 164 contests while competing in five postseason games.
  • 1977: Terry Randolph (DB): Randolph was drafted by the Green Bay Packers with the 290th pick in the 11th round.
  • 1992: Gabe Mokwuah (LB): Mokwuah was drafted by the Green Pack Packers with the 287th pick in the 11th round.

Amherst College 

  • 1972: Jean Fugett (TE): Figett was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys with the 338th pick in the 13th round. The Baltimore, Maryland native played eight seasons in the NFL – he played four seasons with the Cowboys (1972-1975) before finishing his career with the Washington Redskins.
  • 1974: Freddie Scott (WR): Scott was selected by the Baltimore Colts with the 174th pick in the seventh round. The Grandy, Arkansas native played 10 seasons in the NFL – he spent the majority of his career with the Detroit Lions (1978-1983) while competing in four postseason contests. He never won a playoff game.
  • 1978: Bill Swiacki (TE): Swiacki was drafted by the New York Giants with the 232nd pick in the ninth round.
  • 1978: Sean Clancy (LB): Clancy was drafted by the Miami Dolphins with the 217th pick in the eighth round. The Manhasset, New York native played two seasons in the NFL – he spent one year with the Dolphins and his final season with the St. Louis Cardinals. He also competed in just one postseason contest.

Bates College

Bentley University

  • 2008: Mackenzy Bernadeau (G): Bernadeua was selected by the Carolina Panthers with the 250th pick in the seventh round. The Waltham, Massachusetts native played seven seasons, including four with the Dallas Cowboys from 2012 to 2015. He started 49 of 111 games, including all 16 for the Cowboys in 2012. He also played in two postseason games with the Cowboys in 2015 against the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers.

Bowdoin College

  • 1966: Paul Soule (HB): Soule, who was from Portland, Maine, was drafted by the Boston Patriots in the 1966 AFL Draft with 174th pick in the 20th round.
  • 1978: Steve McCabe (G): McCabe, who grew up in Westborough, Massachusetts, was drafted the Washington Redskins with the 324th pick in the 12th round. McCabe is the only member of the Polar Bears football program to be drafted by an NFL team after becoming the school’s first and only student-athlete to earn Kodak Division III All-American honors.

Brandeis University  

Colby College 

  • 1955: John Jacobs (E): Jacobs was selected by the New York Giants with the 224th pick in the 19th round.
  • 1959: Bob Sargent (T): Sargent was drafted by the Washington Redskins with the 292nd pick in the 25th round.

Middlebury College

  • 1949: John Corbisiero (B): Corbisiero was selected by the Chicago Bears with the 169th pick in the 17th round.
  • 1955: Al Dennis (E): Dennis was drafted by the Chicago Cardinals with the 191st pick in the 16th round.
  • 1958: Dick Fusco (T): Fusco was drafted by the New York Giants with the 214th pick in the 18th round.

Norwich University

  • 1943: Walt Domina (HB): Domina was selected by the New York Giants with the 106th pick in the 12th round. A two-spot athlete with the Cadets, Domina was remembered for his impressive play on the gridiron – he still holds individual records for points (31) and most touchdowns scored (five) in a single-game. Both records were recorded against Middlebury in 1940.

Southern Connecticut State University

  • 1963: Ralph Ferrisi (RB): Ferrisi was drafted by two teams – Boston Patriots and Minnesota Vikings. Ferrisi, who was born in Bronx, New York, but graduated from Weymouth High School, played professionally for the Vikings.
  • 1967: Tom Reale (OT): Reale was selected by the New York Giants with the 369th pick in the 15th round.
  • 1967: Dick Nocera (RB): Nocera was selected by the Boston Patriots with the 414th pick in the 16th round of the AFL Draft.
  • 1985: Travis Tucker (TE): Tucker was picked 287th overall in the 11th round by the Cleveland Browns. The Brooklyn, New York native played three seasons for the Browns while competing in a trio of postseason contests.
  • 1987: Scott Mersereau (DT): Mersereau was selected 136th overall in the fifth round by the Los Angeles Rams. The Riverhead, New York native never played for the Rams, however, but competed for the New York Jets from 1987 to 1993. He started in 91 of 102 contests and finished his career with three interceptions and three forced fumbles. He only played in one postseason contest in 1991 against the Houston Oilers.

St. Anselm College

  • 1940: Ray McLean (HB): McLean was drafted by the Chicago Bears with the 192nd pick in the 21st round. The Lowell, Massachusetts native played eight seasons with the Bears, making seven starts in 76 contests. He rushed for five scores while catching 21 touchdowns.

Trinity College

  • 1937: Mickey Kobrosky (QB): Kobrosky was drafted by the New York Giants with the 44th pick in the fifth round. The Springfield, Massachusetts native played seven games for the Giants in 1937, completing 2 of 13 passes for 18 yards while rushing for 41 yards on 13 carries.
  • 1959: Roger LeClerc (LB): LeClerc was drafted by the Chicago Bears with the 177th pick in the 15th round. The Springfield, Massachusetts native was transformed into a kicker with the Bears where he connected on 76 of 152 attempts while drilling 154 of 160 extra points. He did play one season for the Denver Broncos in 1967 before retiring.
  • 1985: Joe Shield (QB): Shielf was selected by the New York Giants with the 44th pick in the fifth round. The Brattleboro, Vermont native played just three games with the Packers during the 1986 season.

Tufts University 

  • 1946: George Feldman (HB): Feldman was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 208th pick in the 22nd round.
  • 1958: George Kurker (T): Kurker was selected by the New York Giants with the 149th pick in the 13th round.
  • 1977: Daryl Brown (DB): Brown was picked 240th in the ninth round by the Cleveland Browns.

UMass Boston

  • 1974: Erle Garrett (DB): The only student-athlete to be drafted in UMass Boston’s history, Garrett was selected by the Minnesota Vikings with the 441st pick in the 17th round.

University of New Haven

  • 1958: Lou Pitney (C): Pitney was drafted by the New York Giants with the 345th pick in the 29th round.
  • 1959: Dick Splain (T): Splain was selected by the Washington Redskins with the 185th pick in the 16th round.
  • 1982: Mile McPherson (DB): McPherson was selected by the Los Angeles Rams with the 256th pick in the 10th round. The Queens, New York native never played a down for the Rams but did play four seasons for the San Diego Chargers while playing in two postseason games against the Miami Dolphins and Pittsburgh Steelers.
  • 1991: Harry Boatswain (G): Boatswain was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers with the 137th pick in the fifth round. The Brooklyn, New York native played began his five-year career with the 49ers before competing for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1995 and the New York Jets in 1996. He also competed in seven postseason games, including four contests against the Dallas Cowboys.

Wesleyan University 

  • 1947: Burt VanderClute (G): Vander Clute was picked 69th overall in the ninth round by the Pittsburgh Steelers.
  • 1947: Jack Medd (C): Medd was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers with the 89th pick in the 11th round.
  • 1948: Jim Burton (E): Burton was drafted by the Boston Yanks with the 69th pick in the ninth round.
  • 1949: John Geary (T): Geary was selected by the New York Bulldogs with the 93rd pick in the 10th round.

Williams College

  • 1970: Jack Maitland (RB): Maitland was selected by the Baltimore Colts with the 408th pick in the 16th round. The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania native played just one season for the Colts, starting two of the 14 games. He rushed for 209 yards on 74 carries for one score while catching nine passes for 67 yards and one touchdown. One year later, Maitland suited up for the New England Patriots where he played for the hometown team in 1971 and 1972.
  • 1976: Scott Perry (DB): Perry was picked 147th overall in the fifth round by the Cincinnati Bengals. The Pleasanton, California native played four seasons with the Bengals before ending his career with both the San Diego Chargers and San Francisco 49ers. Perry played in two postseason games in 1981 with the Chargers.
  • 1996: Ethan Brooks (T): Brooks was selected 229th overall in the seventh round by the Atlanta Falcons. Brooks played seven seasons of professional football, including three with the Baltimore Ravens from 2002-04.

 

Noontime’s Senior Salute: Jeff Spellman (Bates College)

Undefeated Colby men's basketball defeats Bates 101-84 in Alumni

Bates College senior Jeff Spellman averaged a career-best 15.8 points per game this past winter while averaging 4.4 rebounds, 2.3 assists, and 1.1 steals. (PHOTO COURTESY: Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

By NoontimeSports.com 

For the third consecutive season, Bates College senior Jeff Spellman led the Bobcats in scoring as the Boston, Massachusetts native produced 379 points in 24 contests this winter, including a career-high 36 trifectas.

Spellman and the Bobcats concluded their 2019-20 campaign with a 12-13 record, as well as a spot in the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Tournament. Bates faced Colby College in an epic triple-overtime quarterfinal meeting, which saw Spellman net a team-high 23 points on 8 of 21 shooting to go along with four rebounds, four steals, and three assists.

Named to the All-NESCAC Second Team last month, Spellman ranked seventh in the conference in points per game (15.8), which was the highest average by any member of the Bates men’s basketball program since Brian Ellis averaged 15.9 points in 2011.

In 87 contests with the Bobcats, Spellman recorded 1,242 points to go with 359 rebounds, 233 assists, and 73 steals. He also tallied nine blocks, including a trio of swipes this season.

We recently caught up with Jeff Spellman to discuss his final season with the Bobcats, but also his future plans after he graduates later this spring.


What will you remember most about your senior year?

When thinking back on my senior year I am reminded of the commitment to growth demonstrated by every one of my teammates, most notably in the offseason. Regret in sport often spawns from a reflection upon wasted effort in one’s preparation, not a failure in the heat of competition. There is not one member of this 2019-20 team that will have any regrets from this past season.

Looking back on the 2019-20 season, what game (or games) will you will remember most? Why these particular games?

I will never forget our game against Middlebury College. Not only was this our last game of the regular season it was also potentially the last game of my classmates’ careers. Never mind the buzzer-beater by Nick Gilpin, but watching him dominate that entire game was something I won’t ever forget. And beating the tenth-ranked team in the country on the road (at that time) was a great feeling. It provided us with a special feeling going into the NESCAC quarterfinals against Colby.

What have you enjoyed most about competing for the Bates College men’s basketball team (and program) these past four years?

We often spoke of embracing the “wrench” mentality.  Long story short this program welcomes adversity with open arms, occasionally seeking it out. We had nothing given to us; everything we accomplished we fought for. That is why I love Bates basketball.

Once you officially graduate later this spring, do you plan to stay involved with the sport in some capacity? Any interest in coaching?

As of now, my plans are to continue to play basketball at the professional level. When or where that happens is up in the air but I am committed to playing this game as long as I can.

What interested you in pursuing a degree in studio art? What do you hope to do with your degree after graduation?

Art has long been an integral part of my life. Simply put, it’s what I enjoy doing most, outside of basketball. I saw no need to shy away from my passion in college and decided to make it my major.  I typically work with photography and film so I can envision myself down the road continuing to utilize both mediums for the work I plan to produce.

Noontime’s Senior Salute: Eric Savage (Tufts University)

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeSports 

Our Noontime Senior Salutes continue with honoring Eric Savage, who guided the Tufts University men’s basketball team to its first-ever New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) Tournament Championship last month, along with a pair of NCAA D-III Tournament wins.

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Eric Savage helped Tufts University win a pair of NCAA Tournament games last month, as well as the program’s first-ever NESCAC Tournament Championship. (PHOTO COURTESY: Dan Saunders)

Savage, who started all 29 contests this past season, netted his 1,000th career point last November during the Jumbos’ 96-65 win over Lasell University before drilling the game-tying basket during the final seconds of the second half months later against Colby College in the NESCAC Tournament Finals. The game-tying basket provided the Powder Blue and White with enough momentum to outlast the Mules, 102-94, in double-overtime and secure an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament.

After helping his team rally to beat Western Connecticut in the opening round of the 2020 NCAA Tournament, Savage scored 19 points on 5 of 11 shooting to go with seven rebounds, two assists, two blocks, and one steal against RPI in the second round.

An economics major from South Brunswick, New Jersey, Savage averaged 15.8 points per game this past season along with 6.9 rebounds and 3.4 assists. He scored 1,408 points in 105 games while tallying 615 rebounds, 290 assists, and 126 steals.


What will you remember most about your senior year?

Winning our first-ever NESCAC (Tournament) Championship.

Looking back on the 2019-20 season, what game (or games) will you will remember most? Why these particular games?

Our entire postseason run, both our conference tournament and the first NCAA weekend were extremely memorable. Being able to host (all five postseason games) on our home court in front of our families, friends, and fans were awesome. The energy in Cousens Gymnasium was electric and we were able to win all five contests, which made it all the more special.

What have you enjoyed most about competing for the Tufts men’s basketball team (and program) these past four years?

The friendships and relationships I have built over the last four years mean so much and are so special to me. The Tufts basketball program has brought me so much joy over the course of my career and I am happy to have given back to the school by helping to deliver their first (NESCAC) championship.

Once you officially graduate later this spring, do you plan to stay involved with the sport in some capacity? Any interest in coaching?

I would love to be a coach at some point in the future. I am not sure what my specific plans are regarding basketball moving forward, but one thing is for sure and that is I am not ready to say goodbye to the sport just yet.

What interested you in pursuing a major in economics? What do you hope to do with your degree after graduation?

From a young age, I actually wanted to be an astronaut, but when I came to Tufts I was originally majoring in astrophysics. A variety of factors (including my ironic discovery that astronauts cannot be colorblind) forced me to pivot.

In high school, I developed an interest in business and entrepreneurship which led me to an economics major with minors in finance and entrepreneurial leadership studies.