On This Date In History: Tuesday, April 14th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation

Happy Tuesday, everyone – we can say “happy” every day, right?

The sun is shining. The weather is decent – it is pretty nice out (to be blunt!) – and we have a feeling that it will be another good day (fingers crossed, of course!).

As usual, continue to be well and stay safe while enjoying a brand new ‘On This Date in History.’


On This Date in History: April 14th, 2020 

  • 1962: Elgin Baylor paced the Los Angeles Lakers with a game-high 61 points on 22 of 46 shooting which helped the visitors win the fifth game of the 1962 NBA Finals against the Boston Celtics.

    Boston would rebound, however, winning the next two games, including a game six on the west coast, to clinch the series in seven games.

  • 1967: Boston Red Sox rookie pitcher Billy Rohome came close to recording a no-hitter against the New York Yankees in the Bronx. New York’s Elston Howard broke up the “no-no” with a single to right field in the bottom of the ninth. The hit, however, would be followed by a flyball by Charley Smith.

    Rohome concluded the 3-0 victory with five walks and two strikeouts.

  • 1969: The Montreal Expos won their first-ever home game by defeating the St. Louis Cardinals, 8-7.

    The April 14th affair between the Cardinals and Expos marked the first time an MLB game had been played in Canada.

    Montreal would conclude its initial season in sixth place in the National League East with a record of 52-110.

  • 1996: The Detroit Red Wings win their 62nd (and final) regular season contest with a 5-1 victory over the Dallas Stars.

    Detroit, which finished first in the NHL‘s Central Division with 131 points, would go onto win two playoff series before falling to the Colorado Avalanche in the Western Conference Finals.

  • 2002: Tiger Woods wins his third-straight Masters Tournament with a score of 276 (-12). Woods edged Retief Goosen for the victory by three strokes.

On This Date In History: Sunday, April 12th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeSports 

Happy Sunday, everyone!

We hope everyone is doing well, staying positive and optimistic, as well as enjoying the sun, which seems to be fading outside our window.

As usual, we are here every day to provide some relief, a smile and yes, a walk down memory lane with ‘On This Date in History.’


On This Date in History: Sunday, April 12th, 2020 

  • 1909: Eric McNair, who played shortstop, second and third base for the Philadelphia AthleticsBoston Red SoxChicago White Sox, and Detroit Tigers was born today. McNair, who recorded 1,240 hits and 82 home runs, finished first in the American League in doubles (47) in 1932 and first in putouts (305) in 1934.
  • 1941: The Boston Bruins clinched the 1941 NHL Stanley Cup with a game four victory over the Detroit Red Wings. The win occurred on the road after Boston won the first two games of the series on their home ice by a combined score of 5-3.
  • 1958: The St. Louis Hawks clinched the 1958 NBA Championship with a game six win over the Boston Celtics with a 110-109 victory. The Celtics would avenge the loss the following year by beating the Minneapolis Lakers in four-straight contests.
  • 1961: Gen. Douglas MacArthur was offered the position of Baseball Commissioner, but declined.
  • 1981: The Milwaukee Brewers pulverized the Boston Red Sox by a score of 18-1Cecil Cooper concluded the game with five RBI, three runs, and two hits while Ben Oglivie recorded two RBI, two hits, and three runs.

On This Date In History: Friday, April 10th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to Friday, everyone – we also like to call it Fri-Yay (hope that is OK with everyone!).

As usual, we hope this post finds everyone doing well and staying safe – remember, we are ALL in this together, so take a break from the scary news and revisit some exciting sports moments, which occurred on this exact date (April 10th).

Have a wonderful rest of your morning (and day), as well as a wonderful weekend, everyone.


On This Date in History: Friday, April 10th, 2020

  • 1913: President Woodrow Wilson throws the first pitch ahead of the Washington Senators‘ 2-1 victory over the New York Yankees. Additionally, 1913 marked the rebranding of New York’s ballclub from the Highlanders to the Yankees.
  • 1934: The Chicago Blackhawks win their first-ever Stanley Cup with a 1-0 double-overtime win over the Detroit Red Wings. Harold “Mush” March netted the game-winner 11 minutes into the second extra session for Chicago. The game was held at Chicago Stadium.
  • 1945: The Brooklyn Tigers and Boston Yankees merged operations to compete as one team in the 1945 NFL. Referred to as the Yanks, the team played most of its games in Boston and concluded the season with a 3-6-1 record.
  • 1947: Jackie Robinson signed his first major league contract and would become the first African American to play baseball five days when he suited up for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Robinson became the second African American to play baseball after Moses Fleetwood Walker, who broke baseball’s color barrier in baseball in 1884.
  • 1961: President John F. Kennedy attends the Washington Senators‘ 1961 opener to cheer on a new franchise that would eventually become the Texas Rangers in 1972. The original Washington team became the Minnesota Twins following the conclusion of the 1960 Major League Baseball (MLB) season.
  • 1962: 52,564 fans attended the first game at Dodger Stadium to cheer on the Los Angeles Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds. The Dodgers would lose their initial game at their new stadium but would beat the Reds the following day (Wednesday, April 11th, 1962) by a score of 6-2.
  • 1993: The Ottawa Senators snapped a 38-game roading losing streak with a 5-3 win over the New York Islanders. The win, unfortunately, would be followed by three more losses, including a pair of road setbacks to the Boston Bruins (4-2) and Quebec Nordiques (6-2).

Sports History: Detroit Sweeps Boston In The 1943 NHL Stanley Cup

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Boston’s Bill Cowley recorded a career-high 72 points during the Bruins’ 1942-43 season. (PHOTO COURTESY: Boston Bruins Alumni)

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation

For many of us, the thought of hearing about the Stanley Cup Finals in April may seem strange or unusual – normally, the title round is played in late May or early June these days – but on April 8, 1943, the Boston Bruins competed for a championship, but wound up losing to the Detroit Red Wings in the fourth and final game of the series.

Boston, which beat Detroit in the 1941 Stanley Cup in four games, was looking to erase memories of the 1942 postseason, which saw the Red Wings outlast the Bruins in a three-game semifinal series.

The Bruins had won four regular-season contests against the Red Wings during the 1942-43 season, including an early March affair by two goals, but that particular victory didn’t seem to help the Black and Gold identify a winning formula to beat Detroit weeks later in the Stanley Cup Finals.

Detroit won all four contests against the Bruins, including the April 8th meeting at the Boston Garden to clinch the series with a 2-0 victory. Boston was held scoreless during the final two contests after producing two goals in game one and three in game two.

Prior to facing the Red Wings, the Bruins beat the Montreal Canadiens in a five-game semifinal series. Ab DeMarco Sr. clinched the series and secured the Bruins a spot in the title round with an overtime goal at 18:44.

Boston was awarded the O’Brien Trophy, which was presented to the league’s runner-up from 1939 to 1950 while Bill Cowley earned the Hart Trophy (most valuable player). Cowley, who recorded. career-high 72 points during the 1942-43 season, was named a first-team league all-star, while Frank Brimsek, Jack Crawford, and Flash Hollett represented the Bruins on the second-team. Additionally, coach Art Ross was named the second team’s coach.

The 1942-43 season also marked the debut of Bep Guidolin, who was the youngest rookie in NHL history. Guidolin played four seasons with the Bruins before returning to Boston to coach the team during the 1972-73 and 1973-74 seasons.

On This Date In History: Wednesday, April 8th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to Wednesday, everyone!

As always, we hope everyone is doing well and staying safe.

It looks like it is going to be an indoor day from a quick glance outside the window, so stay inside and enjoy a brand new ‘On This Date in History’ for Wednesday, April 8th, 2020.


On This Date in History: Wednesday, April 8th, 2020

  • 1940: John Havlicek, who played 16 seasons for the Boston Celtics and won eight NBA titles with the Green and White, was born on this date in Martins Ferry, Ohio. Nicknamed “Hondo,” the small forward/shooting guard was named to both the NBA’s 35th and 50th Anniversary Teams.
  • 1943: The Detroit Red Wings defeated the Boston Bruins, 2-0, in the fourth game of the NHL‘s Stanley Cup to secure a series sweep of the Black and Gold. The game was held in the Boston Garden – that would be the original Garden for those keeping track at home. Detroit outscored Boston, 6-0, in the final two games of the series.
  • 2003: The Connecticut women’s basketball team defeated Tennessee in the NCAA Championship, capping their campaign with a 37-1 record (the Huskies’ lone setback of the 2002-03 season came against Villanova on Tuesday, March 11, 2003.). Diana Taurasi was named the Most Outstanding Player while earning a spot on the All-Tournament Team with Ann Strother. Tennesse was represented by Gwen Jackson and Kara Lawson.
  • 2012: The Detroit Tigers outlasted the Boston Red Sox, 13-12, in a thrilling eleven inning clash, which took almost five hours to be played. Nick Punto and Mike Aviles concluded the game with three RBI for the Sox, respectively, while Adrian Gonzalez smacked his first home run of the season.
  • 2014: The Connecticut women’s basketball team celebrated another NCAA Championship with a 79-58 win over Notre Dame. The Huskies’ victory came one day after the men’s team beat Kentucky in the championship by a score of 60-54. It was just the second time in NCAA history that the same school had won both the men’s and women’s tournaments after the school won both title games in 2004.