Tag: Georgetown University

Ivy League Coaches, Players Express Excitement For 2021 Season

The Ivy League will announce plans for the fall sports season on Wednesday, July 8. (PHOTO COURTESY: IvyLeague.com)

By Matt Noonan

After having their season canceled due to the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic last summer, all eight Ivy League coaches, along with a few players shared their excitement for returning to the field this fall during this morning’s virtual media day.

“I think the 2021 Ivy League football season has the chance to be its best ever because of the collective effort of all these teams and all these amazing student-athletes,” said Cornell University coach Dave Archer.

“We finally get to showcase our football ability, (and) I’m really looking forward to that.”

While Archer’s excitement was echoed amongst his peers, so was the unknown: how good are these teams going to be this fall?  

Like many college football teams returning to campus this summer, there is a lot of unknowns about each squad considering so many rosters will feature a slew of sophomores and first years that yet to play a single down. But the uncertainty was overshadowed by enthusiasm to practice, and yes, compete again, too, later this year – most teams will begin their preseason later this week.

“We’re anxious and ready to go, and open up this Thursday,” said Dartmouth College coach Buddy Teevens.

Princeton University will enter the 2021 season as the favorite – the Tigers, who have accumulated 28 National Championships, along with 12 league titles since their initial campaign in 1869, return some key pieces from its 2019 squad that finished 8-2 overall. Princeton was unable to capture its second-straight Ivy League crown or at least share the title – Dartmouth and Yale University ended the season as co-champions.

But despite not finishing atop the Ancient Eight two years ago, Princeton coach Bob Surace told the media that his group has “worked really hard” over the last 17 to 18 months and will be ready to compete in a few weeks against Lehigh University.  

“We have a lot of guys who love football, who want to be with their teammates, and who want to see how good we can be,” said Surace.

While the Tigers should be pretty good this season, the same could be said for Dartmouth, Yale, and Harvard University — all four teams were picked to finish in the top half of last week’s preseason poll. And while Dartmouth and Yale maybe early favorites to challenge the Tigers for the top spot, one should not rule out the Crimson, who are returning a lot of seniors that coach Tim Murphy believes will help the squad be successful this year.

“It feels like Christmas is coming and we can’t wait for that day,” said Murphy, who will lead the Crimson into their first game next month against Georgetown University. “We have plenty of challenges ahead of us … we have a ton of work to do (and) we can’t wait to get started.”

The 2021 Ivy League season officially kicks off Saturday, September 18 with six games scheduled to appear on ESPN linear networks, according to the conference website.

Daily Noontime: Friday, February 5, 2021

By NoontimeSports.com

Happy Friday, everyone – we made it!

And welcome to the first Friday of February – let’s celebrate.

It’s a BIG weekend for so many of us as the final game of the 2020 National Football League (NFL) is scheduled for Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Can you believe it?

Kansas City Chiefs and Tampa Bay Buccaneers will compete in Super Bowl on Sunday, which is one of many subjects – and yes, topics, too – discussed on today’s Football Friday Podcast (listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Anchor).

Alright, let’s kickstart the day with a brand new Daily Noontime – as usual, be well, stay safe, and hold the line, everyone!


Friday’s Headlines for February 5, 2021

Finally, our Black History Month celebration on the men and women that have and continue to make an impact on the sports world continued yesterday with getting to know Paul Robeson, who starred as a defensive end with the Rutgers University football team.

Boston Cannons Claim Its Second MLL Championship

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The Boston Cannons celebrated their second Major League Lacrosse Championship on Sunday. (PHOTO Courtesy: Boston Cannons/

By Matt Noonan 

The city of Boston had something to celebrate on Sunday when the Boston Cannons of Major League Lacrosse (MLL) captured its second championship in franchise history by defeating the Denver Outlaws, 13-10.

Sunday’s game between Boston and Denver occurred at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland, which was the home site for the 2020 MLL season.

Boston and Denver were initially scheduled to meet during Saturday’s semifinal, but the game was moved to Sunday following news of three players on the Chesapeake Bayhawks testing positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19). The Bayhawks’ semifinal opponent the Connecticut Hammerheads, which were competing for the first time in franchise history, withdrew from the semifinals when they learned of this news, which was shared through the MLL’s Twitter handle on Saturday.

The Cannons’ three-goal win over the Outlaws was highlighted by John Uppgren (five goals, one assist), who guided Tufts University to a pair of NCAA Championships in 2014 and 2015.

Mark Cockerton contributed three goals and one assist while Bryce WassermanBen Spencer, and Challen Rogers each recorded two points (one goal and one assist), respectively.

Duxbury native Nick Marrocco, who played college lacrosse at Georgetown University, ended Sunday’s championship match with 10 saves.

The championship win was the first for coach Sean Quirk, who was hired to lead the Cannons on October 8, 2015. Quirk became the Cannons’ sixth head coach after guiding the Endicott College men’s lacrosse program for 17 seasons.

Prior to their meeting with the Outlaws on Sunday, Boston won four of six contests, including a 10-8 victory over Denver its season finale.

“We are already looking forward to the 2021 season,” Quirk said, via the Patriot Ledger.

Boston won its first Major League Lacrosse championship in 2011 by edging the Hamilton Nationals, 10-9.

The Patriot League Cancels Fall Sport

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Patriot League (PHOTO COURTESY: BU.edu)

By NoontimeSports.com 

The list of conferences and schools deciding to forgo the upcoming fall sports season due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic added a few more names to the list with this morning’s announcement from the Patriot League.

According to this morning’s release, the Patriot League’s Council of Presidents has decided its best for its member to not “engage” in any competition this fall, which includes both championship and non-championship contests. A decision on winter and spring sports will be made later this year.

The league will permit its members to hold workouts – conditioning and strength training – and practices, but they must adhere to the health and safety requirements for each sport.

Today’s announcement does, however, exclude two of the league’s members – the United States Military Academy and United States Naval Academy – which will be allowed to make its own decisions on their respective sports seasons.

The Patriot League – like most conferences – will explore options to provide its student-athletes that won’t be competing this fall with some opportunities to possibly play in the spring. And that means we could see a small, but limited football season.

Last year, the Holy Cross football team claimed its seventh league crown, as well as the program’s first Patriot League championship since 2009 when they defeated Georgetown University in its season finale.

NCAA President Mark Emmert Is Concerned About Fall Sports

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NCAA President Mark Emmert said no games will be played this fall without students back on campus. (PHOTO COURTESY: Photo by Maxx Wolfson/Getty Images)

By Matt Noonan

As we continue to inch closer toward a brand new college sports season, specifically college football, there seems to be some concern from NCAA President Mark Emmert regarding what various seasons will look like this fall during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 

In a recent podcast appearance on The Comeback: COVID-19 and the Return of Sports from The Athletic, Emmert told host Seth Davis that the current situation is “very, very fluid,” and that whatever happens with fall sports will certainly be different than prior years.

“What we do know for sure is whatever occurs it’s going to be different,” said Emmert, who previously stated during an NCAA Social Series last month on Twitter that college athletics could not occur if students were not on campus.

As for what the upcoming football season looks like, including here in New England, Emmert told Davis that it won’t be what “we’re custom to seeing it year in and year out.”

Earlier this week, we learned Bowdoin College would not be playing football this fall – maybe this spring? – while Morehouse College announced today that its cross country nor football teams would not be competing for Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) championships this fall. 

The Patriot League announced its plans for the upcoming fall sports season on Monday, which included guidelines for its seven members that play football. Teams will not be allowed to fly to away games while the league stated that “with rare exceptions, the regular-season competition will exclude overnight travel.” 

Holy Cross, which captured the Patriot League crown last fall with a 24-0 victory over Georgetown University, shouldn’t have to fly too many games this fall as eight of its current contests, including three conference matchups, are scheduled to take place in either Massachusetts or Connecticut. However, the Crusaders’ season-opener against Merrimack College on Thursday, September 3 could be canceled due to the league not allowing its members to compete against non-conference foes until Friday, September 4. 

As of today, we are 10 weeks away from the first official weekend of college football in New England as well as 69 days away from watching a slew of teams kick-off their respective campaigns on Thursday, September 3, including Bentley University, University of Connecticut and University of Massachusetts Amherst

Will games begin on time or be pushed back to later in September? Could we see games moved to October, November, or even December? What about pushing back the season until next spring? 

No matter what, Emmert knows the upcoming college sports season will look so much different than it has previously and may only feature conference or in-state contests along with a slew of regional games.

“Nobody can predict anything with certainty and so therefore you shouldn’t rule anything out,” said Emmert. 

“I certainly think that sitting here today that there will be football in the fall. I think it will be different in many respects whether it’s the audiences in attendance or not in attendance, whether it’s the nature of the schedule, whether it’s the length of the season – you know, all of those things will be different and certainly the protocol and the way the games are played and the healthcare that surrounding that has got to be different.”