On This Date In History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020

OTDApr11th2020

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Weekend, everyone!

We hope your Saturday is filled with sunshine (and better weather) compared to earlier this week when we had some rain (and overcast skies).

As usual, we will continue to pump out this post every day with hopes to bring a smile to everyone’s face during this unusual and scary time.

Be well, stay safe, and have a wonderful rest of your morning (and day), everyone!


On This Date in History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020 

  • 1917: Babe Ruth tossed a complete game while recording one run and one hit during four at-bats as the Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees, 10-3, in their season-opener at the Polo Grounds. Ruth retired just one batter of 35 batters he faced while yielding just three runs on three hits to go with three walks. Boston’s Harry Hooper concluded the contest with three runs and three hits.
  • 1961: The Boston Celtics clinched the 1961 NBA Finals series with a 121-112 win over the St. Louis Hawks. Boston, which needed five games to beat the Hawks, was led by Bill Russell, who concluded the game with 30 points and 38 rebounds.
  • 1966: Emmett Ashford became the first African American to umpire a major league baseball game – his first contest was held in Washington D.C. Stadium between the Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians. Ashford was spotted at third base.
  • 1975: Hank Aaron played his first home game with the Milwaukee Brewers since September 22, 1965. Aaron was traded back to Milwaukee from the Atlanta Braves in 1974 – he received a phone call on Saturday, November 2, 1974, from the President of the Brewers, Bud Selig.
  • 1976: Raymond Floyd won his only Masters title by beating runner-up Ben Crenshaw by eight strokes.
  • 1992: The Boston Red Sox needed 19 innings to beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-5, in just their third game of the 1992 season. The win – Boston’s first of the season – spoiled Cleveland’s home opener and was highlighted by a two-run home run in the top of the 19th by Tim Naehring.

    Boston would go onto win 73 games in 1992, but finish seventh in the American League East.

  • 2004: Phil Mickelson won his first major championship – the 68th Masters Tournament – with a birdie on the final hole, which helped him edge runner-up Ernie Els.

On This Date In Sports History: Saturday, April 4th, 2020

OnThisDateApril4th2020

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Saturday, everyone – we hope everyone is doing well and staying safe, of course!

Starting today – and every day going forward! – we are going to hop back in time and share some exciting sports memories for each particular day. And today, our post is all about what happened in the sports world on April 4th, enjoy.


On This Date in History: April 4th

  • 1948: 84-year-old Connie Mack challenged 78-year-old Clark Griffith to a race from home plate to first base. And the end result was a tie.
  • 1974: Hank Aaron tied Babe Ruth‘s home run record (714) against the Cincinnati Reds. Four days later (April 8th, to be exact) he would break the record from 1935, establishing a new mark for home runs with 715.
  • 1986: Wayne Gretzky recorded his 213th point of the 1985-86 season during a 9-3 setback to the Calgary Flames. Gretzky, who would finish the year with 215 points, broke his old record of 212 points in a single0season.
  • 1993: The Texas Tech women’s basketball team captured its initial NCAA Championship with an 84-82 win over Ohio State. Sheryl Swoopes, who was named the Most Outstanding Player, established a single-game championship scoring record of 47 points.
  • 1994: Arkansas‘ men’s basketball team won its first-ever NCAA Championship – the Razorbacks beat the Blue Devils of Duke in the title game.
  • 1997: The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim secured their first-ever postseason berth, which would conclude in the NHL conference semifinals. The Ducks won their first-ever postseason series in the quarterfinals – they outlasted the Phoenix Coyotes in seven games before falling to the Detroit Red Wings in four-straight semifinal contests.
  • 1998: The re-branded NFL Europe, which was originally named the World League of American Football, kicked-off a brand new season The Rhein Fire would be crowned the champions weeks later when they beat the Frankfurt Galaxy in the World Bowl by a score of 34-10.
  • 2011: Coach Jim Calhoun leads the Connecticut men’s basketball team to an NCAA Championship – the Huskies beat Butler, 53-41. Current Boston Celtics guard Kemba Walker scored 16 points for the Huskies.

Few Thoughts On Clemens Perjury Trial

Did Roger Clemens earn another win for the record book? (Photo Credit: New York Daily News)

By Matt Noonan 

Once Monday’s news was announced about Roger Clemens, it became quite easy to realize that government and sports don’t coincide.

Clemens, who was acquitted of charges toward lying about steroids and human growth hormones to Congress in 2008, was officially sent out of a Washington courtroom as a “free man” on Monday.

And while many are continuing to scratch their heads over this particular case, it certainly emphasizes the fact that an athlete is more powerful than a group of non-baseball fans, ahem…the jury.

Of course, he will certainly be remembered as one of the greatest pitchers to ever play the game.

The Rocket spent 24-years in the big leagues, and walked away with a record of 354-184 on the bump. He appeared in 11 All-Star Games, earned seven Cy Young Awards, paced the American League with the most wins by a flame-thrower in ’86, ’87, ’97, and ’98, and was awarded the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1986.

Yet, excluding those various credentials, it’s unlikely that his name will ever be scratched from the so-called, “steroids era.”

Baseball has become a game of cheaters. Players seem more focused on their various accolades than winning a World Series, and the same could possibly be said for Clemens, right?

Clemens will certainly be remembered as a cheater, as well as someone who maneuvered his way forward with various performance enhancement drugs to extend his career, and one example could be seen when he joined the Toronto Blue Jays for a two-year stint in ’97-’98.

The right-hander hadn’t earned 20 wins or more since the 1980’s, and after a few up-and-down seasons with the Boston Red Sox, Clemens’ numbers skyrocketed in Canada, as he won 41 of 54 games. He also earned two back-to-back Cy Young Awards, too.

So, did the government strike out or did Clemens earn himself another win for the record books?

Well, according to the New York Times, this particular trial was a so-called, “waste of government time, and money.” Clemens became the second Major Leaguer to sneak through the cracks — the first was Barry Bonds, who was sentenced to one month of house arrest after a seven-year investigation in April of 2011. And while Bonds was convicted on one of four charges, (obstructing justice) he still managed to walk out of the courtroom.

Clemens avoided 10 years in federal prison, but will now be faced with the difficult task of convincing the baseball writers that he deserves a spot in the Cooperstown, (he’ll need 75 percent of the ballots to earn a spot).

All in all, I believe that he cheated. Clemens, Bonds and others turned America’s Pastime into a game that’s no longer linked to the days of Ted Williams, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron and others.

Will baseball ever resort back to the “good ole days?”

I’m not sure, but once again, the government failed to send a message to all baseball fans and players that cheating is not allowed in a game and life.