Noontime’s Senior Salute: Caty Flagg (UMass Boston)

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By NoontimeSports.com 

For Caty Flagg, this past season was all about enjoying the moment, while making memories of both home and away contests.

The Methuen, Massachusetts native, who played goalie for the UMass Boston women’s ice hockey team, says her goal was to not just “live in the moment,” but cherish time with her friends and teammates.

“I’ll always remember the fun times we had throughout this past season,” said Flagg, who started 25 of 26 games for the Beacons this past winter. “I’ll remember our team practices, lifts, and preseasons, but most importantly, our team dinners to hanging out (off the ice with everyone) while enjoying each other’s company.”

With Flagg between the pipes, the Beacons won 12 games while making an appearance in the New England Hockey Conference (NEHC) playoffs. UMass Boston won eight conference games while capturing seven of 12 road contests.

Flagg, who backstopped Austin Prep to a state championship in 2016, became the Beacons’ first-ever netminder to be named the goaltender of the year by the NEHC in February. The senior goalie earned first-team honors, as well, and finished the season second in the conference in goals-against average (1.84) and save percentage (.942). She posted career-bests in wins (12), winning percentage (.519), and saves (800).

Prior to her team’s postseason clash with the University of Southern Maine, Flagg helped the Beacons beat Colby College, 2-1, behind 45 saves. The win over the Mules was the Beacons’ first against a nationally ranked opponent since 2016 when UMass Boston edged Norwich University in the NEHC Championship.

We recently spoke with Caty Flagg about competing for the UMass Boston women’s ice hockey team, as well as her plans beyond graduation this spring.


Was there a game (or two) that you will remember most from either your senior or junior season with the Beacons? If so, which game(s) are they? 

I have two memorable games. One from last season and one from this season.

Last year, we were the seventh-seed in the NECH playoffs and drew second-seed Suffolk University in the quarterfinals. We had tied and lost to Suffolk earlier in the season but for this particular game, we came in with some confidence that helped us beat them by one goal (2-1). The energy everyone exerted on this particular day was unbelievable and it was definitely one of the most exciting games I’ve ever played in.

Another memorable game was earlier this year against Colby. At the time, Colby was undefeated and ranked tenth in the country. We knew before the game that we were the underdogs, so we went in with the mindset that we had nothing to lose. And we won the game, too. It was unbelievable.

What have you enjoyed most about competing for the UMass Boston women’s ice hockey program these past two years? What will you miss most after graduation? 

I would have to say, my teammates. Waking up every day and going to lifts or practices with them before a long day of classes, but everyone was always there for each other, both on and off the ice.

I am going to miss waking up every day and getting to play the game I love. It was always the best way to start off my day. I have been playing hockey since I was younger and it is going to be different not lacing up the skates each morning in the winter. I do look forward to staying in touch with my teammates, who have become great friends and will be back next year to cheer them on from the stands. 

Tell me about your major. How did you choose it and what do you plan to do with it after graduation? 

I’m an exercise and health sciences major so I am thinking of becoming a personal trainer after graduation.

I became interested in this subject when I attended the University of New England as a freshman and sophomore. I was able to apply what I had learned at UNE when I arrived at UMass Boston as a junior last school year.

Due to COVID-19, my summer internship with a local gym has been shifted to online courses, but I have been able to create in-home workouts, along with a health and wellness program for someone in my family, which keeps me motivated.

This particular time has allowed me to identify what I truly want to do and that is personal training as well as some coaching.

Sports History: Detroit Sweeps Boston In The 1943 NHL Stanley Cup

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Boston’s Bill Cowley recorded a career-high 72 points during the Bruins’ 1942-43 season. (PHOTO COURTESY: Boston Bruins Alumni)

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation

For many of us, the thought of hearing about the Stanley Cup Finals in April may seem strange or unusual – normally, the title round is played in late May or early June these days – but on April 8, 1943, the Boston Bruins competed for a championship, but wound up losing to the Detroit Red Wings in the fourth and final game of the series.

Boston, which beat Detroit in the 1941 Stanley Cup in four games, was looking to erase memories of the 1942 postseason, which saw the Red Wings outlast the Bruins in a three-game semifinal series.

The Bruins had won four regular-season contests against the Red Wings during the 1942-43 season, including an early March affair by two goals, but that particular victory didn’t seem to help the Black and Gold identify a winning formula to beat Detroit weeks later in the Stanley Cup Finals.

Detroit won all four contests against the Bruins, including the April 8th meeting at the Boston Garden to clinch the series with a 2-0 victory. Boston was held scoreless during the final two contests after producing two goals in game one and three in game two.

Prior to facing the Red Wings, the Bruins beat the Montreal Canadiens in a five-game semifinal series. Ab DeMarco Sr. clinched the series and secured the Bruins a spot in the title round with an overtime goal at 18:44.

Boston was awarded the O’Brien Trophy, which was presented to the league’s runner-up from 1939 to 1950 while Bill Cowley earned the Hart Trophy (most valuable player). Cowley, who recorded. career-high 72 points during the 1942-43 season, was named a first-team league all-star, while Frank Brimsek, Jack Crawford, and Flash Hollett represented the Bruins on the second-team. Additionally, coach Art Ross was named the second team’s coach.

The 1942-43 season also marked the debut of Bep Guidolin, who was the youngest rookie in NHL history. Guidolin played four seasons with the Bruins before returning to Boston to coach the team during the 1972-73 and 1973-74 seasons.

Noontime’s All-Decade Boston Bruins Team (2010-19)

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Members of both the 2010-11 and 2011-12 Boston Bruins players pose in front of the team’s last Stanley Cup Banner. (PHOTO COURTESY: Matt Noonan/NoontimeSports.com)

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

It’s time to kick-off a brand new week here at Noontime Sports (and NoontimeSports.com) – we are calling it the “All-Decade Week” where we will be producing content about various sports teams from the past ten years, beginning with our very own Boston Bruins squad from 2010 to 2019.

We’re excited for a fun week of content on the past decade of both Boston and New England sports – we hope you are as well – so again, enjoy our very first team of the week, which highlights some key members of the Black and Gold, including skaters from the 2011 Stanley Cup squad.


Noontime’s All-Decade Boston Bruins Team (Starting Line-Up)

Offense (Forward): Brad Marchand (2018-19): Marchand was a player to watch last season as he tallied a career-highs in assists (64) and points (100) while netting 36 goals (he was three markers shy of matching a career-best of 39 goals from 2017). He tallied additional career-bests last season in power-play goals (10), game-winning goals (nine), even strength assists (36) and four power-play assists. In the postseason, he recorded a career-high 23 points in 24 contests, including a pair of game-winning goals.

Offense (Center): Patrice Bergeron (2013-2014): A four-time Frank J. Selke Trophy Winner, Bergeron has been a key member for the Bruins, both this current season and since he arrived in Boston for his initial campaign with the Black and Gold in 2003. The tenured center claimed his third Selke award during the 2014-15 season after producing 62 points in 80 regular-season contests. He scored seven game-winning goals, which matched his mark from the 2016-17 season while tallying 243 shots on goal. He averaged close to 18 minutes of ice time and was considered for the Hart Memorial Trophy (placed fifth) and Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (placed 13th).

Offense (Center): David Krejci (2013-14): A nominee for both the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy and Frank J. Selke Trophy, Krejci concluded the 2013-14 season with 69 points on 19 goals and 50 assists. He netted 16 even-strength goals, which is just five less than his career-best of 21 from the 2011-12 season while also recording three power-play goals and six game-winning markers. Finally, he concluded the season with a career-high of 16 power-play assists.

Defense: Zdeno Chara (2011-12): One year after captaining the Bruins to its sixth Stanley Cup Championship, Chara turned in an impressive 2011-12 season which saw the defender record career-highs in assists (40) and points (52), as well as be considered for the Hart Memorial Trophy and James Norris Memorial Trophy for the top defensemen. Chara concluded the regular season with eight power-play goals, 10 power-play assists, and 224 shots on goal.

Defense: Torey Krug (2013-14): A nominee for the Calder Memorial Trophy (Rookie of the Year), Krug concluded his team’s 2013-14 campaign with 40 points on 26 assists and 14 goals to go along with 77 blocks, 50 hits, and 24 takeaways. He tallied eight even-strength goals and two game-winning tallies while tallying 183 shots on goal. In 12 postseason contests, Krug produced 10 points on eight assists and two goals while recording 13 blocks, eight hits, and four takeaways.

Goalie: Tim Thomas (2010-11): A winner of both the Conn Smythe Trophy and Vezina Trophy, Thomas backstopped the Bruins to their sixth Stanley Cup Championship in franchise history by yielding 1.98 goals per game in the postseason. He concluded the regular season with a career-best 2.00 goals allowed average and .938 save percentage. He won 35 games – he started 55 contests – and recorded 1,699 saves. He won 16 postseason contests and posted career-highs in shots against (849), saves (798), and save percentage (.940). He also registered four shutouts in the 2011 postseason.

The 68th Beanpot Tournament Begins Monday, February 3rd, 2020

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The 68th Beanpot is scheduled to commence Monday, Feb. 3rd, 2020. (PHOTO COURTESY: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beanpot_(ice_hockey))

By NoontimeSports.com 

Sure, it may be ‘Super Bowl Sunday,’ but today marks the day before one of the great Boston sports traditions: The Beanpot Tournament, which is scheduled to commence tomorrow, Monday, February 3rd at the TD Garden.

Northeastern University, which won the two-day, four-team tournament last season, will attempt to capture the 68th Beanpot Tournament beginning tomorrow when they skate against Harvard University at 5 p.m.

Also competing tomorrow is Boston College and Boston University – the two rivals will square-off at 8 p.m.

Both contests, as well as next Monday’s (Feb. 10th) consolation and championship games, can be seen on NESN. For fans outside the New England region, all four games can be seen on either the NHL Network (North America) or TSN2 (Canada).

Northeastern has never won three-straight tournaments but has captured back-to-back championships twice, including the past two seasons (2018 and 2019)

Boston University, which has won 30 titles since the two-day, four-team tournament commenced in 1952 at the Boston Arena (now Matthews Arena), has not celebrated a championship since beating Northeastern in 2015.

Boston College last won the Beanpot in 2016, while Harvard ended a lengthy drought in 2017 with a 6-3 victory over Boston University.

Boston College, Harvard, and Northeastern enter tomorrow’s tournament as ranked teams, while Boston University is receiving votes, according to the latest USCHO.com poll.

2020 Beanpot Schedule 

  • Monday, February 3rd, 2020: Harvard University vs. Northeastern University (5 p.m.)
  • Monday, February 3rd, 2020: Boston College vs. Boston University (8 p.m.)
  • Monday, February 10th, 2020: Consolation Game (BC-BU) vs. (Harvard-Northeastern) (4:30 p.m.)
  • Monday, February, 10th, 2020: Championship Game (BC-BU) vs. (Harvard-Northeastern) (7:30 p.m.)

2020 Beanpot Links

  • 6 Questions about the Beanpot Tournament (Boston.com)
  • Previewing the 2020 Beanpot Tournament (NCAA.com)
  • NESN will air live and exclusive coverage of the 68th Beanpot (NESN.com)
  • Can Harvard top Northeastern in the opening game of the 68th Beanpot? (Harvard Crimson)
  • Northeastern seeks its first-ever three-peat. (Sentinel & Enterprise)
  • McInnis brothers hope to lead Boston College to a Beanpot Championship (The Patriot Ledger)

Catching Up With Katie Zimmerman (Western New England Women’s Ice Hockey)

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Katie Zimmerman was named earlier this month the first coach of the Western New England women’s ice hockey program, which is scheduled to begin competition in 2020. (PHOTO COURTESY: Diana McNamara)

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeSports 

Katie Zimmerman seems very excited to coach the first Western New England women’s ice hockey team, which is scheduled to play its first contest during the 2020-21 school year.

“Being able to start my own program at the college level is very, very special,” said Zimmerman, who arrives in Springfield after assisting the Amherst College women’s ice hockey team since the 2014-15 season.

“I have categorized it as a life experience (because) it is going to be both exciting and challenging, but also a full-circle feeling to build a program and help grow the game at the next level.”

Zimmerman was named the program’s initial coach earlier this month when the institution announced they would be adding a women’s ice hockey program.

A forward for the Hamilton College women’s ice hockey team, Zimmerman led the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) in goals scored during her junior and senior seasons, while also earning a pair of all-league selections.

In addition to assisting coach Jeff Matthews at Amherst, Zimmerman has prior coaching experience with USA Hockey and SUNY Cortland.

Noontime Sports recently caught-up with Zimmerman to discuss her excitement for starting the women’s ice hockey program at Western New England.

On getting a startup program started: The very first thing to do is to make sure people know about the program. So, what I have done is introduce or reintroduce myself to former colleagues and coaches at both the youth and high-school level, as well as camp directors and advisors to educate them about this new program. I have let people know that this is an exciting opportunity, not just for myself, but for so many people that are going to be able to support it, including the first-ever student-athletes that will have a chance to write the first chapter of the program’s history. Besides spreading the news, it is also time to begin building relationships with prospective student-athletes, too.

I am really excited about this opportunity. I believe in this program, and I am looking for recruits who are just as excited as I am. 

On learning from prior startup women’s ice hockey programs: I do have contact with coaches that have started their own NCAA Division I and III programs, so it is very interesting to speak with them and learn how they got their programs started. There are so many interesting aspects of building an inaugural team.

On spreading the word of the new program to the entire country: The midwest and northeast are hockey hotbeds. Minnesota, Massachusetts, and Michigan are the three top states for girl’s hockey, so those are target areas, but I am casting a wide net for potential student-athletes that want to join our program. I have seen some impressive players come out of California, Colorado, and even Texas and Florida, so I am definitely spreading the news outside the northeast and making sure to focus on bringing in individuals that will set the tone for the program’s culture. I have been really lucky to chat with so many people that have provided me with ideas as to what I should do with recruiting, to the hockey x’s and o’s stuff as well, but it has been very helpful learning more about how my colleagues and coaching friends have started their respective programs.

On publicizing the news through social media: I recently launched a WNE women’s ice hockey Instagram account and plan to follow up with Twitter and Facebook soon. Social media is a primary mode of communication for so many people these days and I am excited to get some good content out there. 

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Katie Zimmerman competed for Hamilton College in the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC). (PHOTO COURTESY:


On falling in love with the sport of hockey: My love for hockey began in the driveway. I grew up on a street with many other young kids, and I would jump into street hockey games whenever I could. I loved ripping around the neighborhood on my roller blades that I had my seventh birthday party at an inline skating arena. I vividly remember going to the arena with my mom and seeing a roller hockey game being played, and I asked my mom if I could play. She signed me up on the spot. I was one of only two girls in the roller hockey league for three years before I transitioned to ice hockey at 10-years-old. I grew more and more serious about ice hockey as time went on, and my love for the sport only grew.

Some of my all-time best friends have been former teammates and many of my favorite moments revolve around hockey. And when I’m not coaching the sport, I’m a passionate follower of the National Hockey League (NHL) and a loyal Detroit Red Wings fan!

Some favorite memories of the game: I could write a book about my favorite memories. When I was a senior in high school I played for a team in Michigan called Victory Honda, and that year alone holds so many of my all-time favorite hockey memories. The best part of that year was that it felt like we were all best friends, both on and off the ice – I still keep in touch to this day) – which made every moment at the rink so much fun. I also had a blast playing in college, where every game-day felt like a holiday. 

Zimmerman’s all-time favorite hockey player: Pavel Datsyuk, who used to play for the Detroit Red Wings. His nickname was “The Magician” because he could do unimaginably creative things with the puck. I thought he was the most entertaining player to watch and a really strong two-way player, too. To this day, I’ve never seen another player that plays the game like he did. 


Stay connected with Noontime Sports’ hockey coverage on Twitter by following @NoontimeHockey!