New England Patriots Begin Their 2020 Campaign Against The Miami Dolphins

vonvagml7jrocoob411m

New England Patriots logo. (PHOTO COURTESY: Patriots.com)

By NoontimeSports.com 

The post-Tom Brady era will officially begin for the New England Patriots on Sunday, September 13 when they host the Miami Dolphins for a 1 p.m. kick-off.

Miami and New England last met in the opening week of the 2014 season when the Dolphins beat the Patriots, 33-20. New England would rebound the following week before eventually winning their fourth Super Bowl championship in franchise history.

Following their home-opener against the Dolphins, New England will visit the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday, September 20 for an 8:20 p.m. kick-off before closing out the first month of the 2020 season at home one week later against the Las Vegas Raiders.

The Patriots will play three games in October, including a 4:25 p.m. contest against the Kansas City Chiefs. New England will then compete in five games in November, including three road games against the Buffalo BillsHouston Texans, and New York Jets before playing four times in December.

New England’s final two contests will be home games against the Bills and Jets. Their final regular-season game against New York will be played on Sunday, January 3 with kick-off scheduled for 1 p.m.

Prior to their initial contest of the 2020 season, the Patriots will play back-to-back preseason games against the Detroit Lions and Carolina Panthers before hitting the road to compete against the Philadelphia Eagles (week three) and New York Giants (week four).

The 2020 schedule will certainly be a challenging one for New England, which is scheduled to compete against six teams that competed in last season’s postseason, as well as the two teams that squared-off in Super Bowl LIV.


New England Patriots 2020 Schedule 

  • Week One (Sept. 13, 2020): New England vs. Miami Dolphins, 1 p.m.
  • Week Two (Sept. 20, 2020): New England at Seattle Seahawks, 8:20 p.m.
  • Week Three (Sept. 27, 2020): New England vs. Las Vegas Raiders, 1 p.m.
  • Week Four (Oct. 4, 2020): New England at Kansas City Cheifs, 4:25 p.m.
  • Week Five (Oct. 11, 2020): New England vs. Denver Broncos, 1 p.m.
  • Week Six: Bye
  • Week Seven (Oct. 25, 2020): New England vs. San Francisco 49ers, 4:25 p.m.
  • Week Eight (Nov. 1, 2020): New England at Buffalo Bills, 1 p.m.
  • Week Nine (Nov. 9, 2020): New England at New York Jets, 8:15 p.m.
  • Week 10 (Nov. 15, 2020): New England vs. Baltimore Ravens, 8:20 p.m.
  • Week 11 (Nov. 22, 2020): New England at Houston Texans, 1 p.m.
  • Week 12 (Nov. 29, 2020): New England vs. Arizona Cardinals, 1 p.m.
  • Week 13 (Dec. 6, 2020): New England at Los Angeles Chargers, 4:25 p.m.
  • Week 14  (Dec. 10, 2020): New England at Los Angeles Rams, 8:20 p.m.
  • Week 15 (Dec. 20, 2020): New England at Miami Dolphins, 1 p.m.
  • Week 16 (Dec. 28, 2020): New England vs. Buffalo Bills, 8:15 p.m.
  • Week 17 (Jan. 3, 2021): New England vs. New York Jets, 1 p.m.

Harvard’s Shelton-Mosley Signs With The Kansas City Chiefs

FBL_1718_Dartmouth_Shelton-Mosley_Justice_0114_NEW_Rotator

Justice Shelton-Mosley, who competed for Harvard University from 2015-2018, signed an undrafted free agent contract with the Kansas City Chiefs. (PHOTO COURTESY: Gil Talbot/Harvard University Athletics)

By Matt Noonan 

Former Harvard University wide receiver and special teamer Justice Shelton-Mosley, who competed for Vanderbilt University this past fall, has signed an undrafted free agent contract with the Kansas City Chiefs.

The Sacramento, California native competed in 32 games for the Crimson, catching 148 passes for 1,921 yards and seven touchdowns. Additionally, he returned kickoffs and punts in all four seasons – he returned a season-high two punt returns for touchdowns during the team’s 2017 campaign.

Shelton-Mosley is currently third in program history in career receptions (148) and fifth in career receiving yards and was a two-time STATS FCS All-American.

At Vanderbilt, Shelton-Mosley caught 14 passes for 97 yards while returning 17 kickoffs and 16 punt returns. He averaged 18.1 yards on kickoffs and 9.1 yards on punts.

New England Small Colleges In The NFL & AFL Draft

Tom Carr WEB

Bates College fullback Tom Carr, who is one of two Bobcats to rush for 30 touchdowns in a career, was drafted by the Boston Patriots in 1966. (PHOTO COURTESY: Bates College.)

By NoontimeSports.com 

The 2020 NFL Draft is just a few hours away – are you excited?

While we anxiously await to hear who will be this year’s first-round pick – most likely Joe Burrow, right? – we wanted to highlight some former New England small college players that heard their names announced during past NFL and American Football League (AFL) Drafts.

Our list was created with the help of ProFootballReference.com’s NFL and AFL Draft History.


American International College (AIC)

  • 1944: Myron Majewski (Tackle): Majewski was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 328th pick in the 32nd round.
  • 1953: Bill Murray (End): Murray was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 272nd pick in the 23rd round.
  • 1957: Tom Rychlec (End): Rychlec was selected by the Detroit Lions with the 119th pick in the 10th round. The Meriden, Connecticut native played one season with the Lions before competing for the Buffalo Bills of the American Football League (AFL)from 1960 to 1963.
  • 1961: Joe Scibelli (G): Scibelli was drafted by two teams – the New York Titans of the AFL and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL. He elected to play for the Rams and played for Los Angeles from 1961 to 1975. He started 195 of 202 games on defense. The Springfield, Massachusetts native competed in six postseason contests.
  • 1961: Andy Griffith (RB): Griffith was drafted by the New York Titans of the American Football League with the 198th pick in the 25th round.
  • 1967: Bill Delaney (TE): Delaney was selected by the Atlanta Falcons with the 112th pick in the fifth round.
  • 1970: Glen Dumont (RB): Dumont was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs with the 364th pick in the 14th round.
  • 1972: Bruce Laird (DB): Laird was drafted by the Baltimore Colts with the 152nd pick in the sixth round. The Lowell, Massachusetts native played ten seasons in the NFL – eight with the Colts and two with the San Diego Chargers. He started in 127 of 164 contests while competing in five postseason games.
  • 1977: Terry Randolph (DB): Randolph was drafted by the Green Bay Packers with the 290th pick in the 11th round.
  • 1992: Gabe Mokwuah (LB): Mokwuah was drafted by the Green Pack Packers with the 287th pick in the 11th round.

Amherst College 

  • 1972: Jean Fugett (TE): Figett was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys with the 338th pick in the 13th round. The Baltimore, Maryland native played eight seasons in the NFL – he played four seasons with the Cowboys (1972-1975) before finishing his career with the Washington Redskins.
  • 1974: Freddie Scott (WR): Scott was selected by the Baltimore Colts with the 174th pick in the seventh round. The Grandy, Arkansas native played 10 seasons in the NFL – he spent the majority of his career with the Detroit Lions (1978-1983) while competing in four postseason contests. He never won a playoff game.
  • 1978: Bill Swiacki (TE): Swiacki was drafted by the New York Giants with the 232nd pick in the ninth round.
  • 1978: Sean Clancy (LB): Clancy was drafted by the Miami Dolphins with the 217th pick in the eighth round. The Manhasset, New York native played two seasons in the NFL – he spent one year with the Dolphins and his final season with the St. Louis Cardinals. He also competed in just one postseason contest.

Bates College

Bentley University

  • 2008: Mackenzy Bernadeau (G): Bernadeua was selected by the Carolina Panthers with the 250th pick in the seventh round. The Waltham, Massachusetts native played seven seasons, including four with the Dallas Cowboys from 2012 to 2015. He started 49 of 111 games, including all 16 for the Cowboys in 2012. He also played in two postseason games with the Cowboys in 2015 against the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers.

Bowdoin College

  • 1966: Paul Soule (HB): Soule, who was from Portland, Maine, was drafted by the Boston Patriots in the 1966 AFL Draft with 174th pick in the 20th round.
  • 1978: Steve McCabe (G): McCabe, who grew up in Westborough, Massachusetts, was drafted the Washington Redskins with the 324th pick in the 12th round. McCabe is the only member of the Polar Bears football program to be drafted by an NFL team after becoming the school’s first and only student-athlete to earn Kodak Division III All-American honors.

Brandeis University  

Colby College 

  • 1955: John Jacobs (E): Jacobs was selected by the New York Giants with the 224th pick in the 19th round.
  • 1959: Bob Sargent (T): Sargent was drafted by the Washington Redskins with the 292nd pick in the 25th round.

Middlebury College

  • 1949: John Corbisiero (B): Corbisiero was selected by the Chicago Bears with the 169th pick in the 17th round.
  • 1955: Al Dennis (E): Dennis was drafted by the Chicago Cardinals with the 191st pick in the 16th round.
  • 1958: Dick Fusco (T): Fusco was drafted by the New York Giants with the 214th pick in the 18th round.

Norwich University

  • 1943: Walt Domina (HB): Domina was selected by the New York Giants with the 106th pick in the 12th round. A two-spot athlete with the Cadets, Domina was remembered for his impressive play on the gridiron – he still holds individual records for points (31) and most touchdowns scored (five) in a single-game. Both records were recorded against Middlebury in 1940.

Southern Connecticut State University

  • 1963: Ralph Ferrisi (RB): Ferrisi was drafted by two teams – Boston Patriots and Minnesota Vikings. Ferrisi, who was born in Bronx, New York, but graduated from Weymouth High School, played professionally for the Vikings.
  • 1967: Tom Reale (OT): Reale was selected by the New York Giants with the 369th pick in the 15th round.
  • 1967: Dick Nocera (RB): Nocera was selected by the Boston Patriots with the 414th pick in the 16th round of the AFL Draft.
  • 1985: Travis Tucker (TE): Tucker was picked 287th overall in the 11th round by the Cleveland Browns. The Brooklyn, New York native played three seasons for the Browns while competing in a trio of postseason contests.
  • 1987: Scott Mersereau (DT): Mersereau was selected 136th overall in the fifth round by the Los Angeles Rams. The Riverhead, New York native never played for the Rams, however, but competed for the New York Jets from 1987 to 1993. He started in 91 of 102 contests and finished his career with three interceptions and three forced fumbles. He only played in one postseason contest in 1991 against the Houston Oilers.

St. Anselm College

  • 1940: Ray McLean (HB): McLean was drafted by the Chicago Bears with the 192nd pick in the 21st round. The Lowell, Massachusetts native played eight seasons with the Bears, making seven starts in 76 contests. He rushed for five scores while catching 21 touchdowns.

Trinity College

  • 1937: Mickey Kobrosky (QB): Kobrosky was drafted by the New York Giants with the 44th pick in the fifth round. The Springfield, Massachusetts native played seven games for the Giants in 1937, completing 2 of 13 passes for 18 yards while rushing for 41 yards on 13 carries.
  • 1959: Roger LeClerc (LB): LeClerc was drafted by the Chicago Bears with the 177th pick in the 15th round. The Springfield, Massachusetts native was transformed into a kicker with the Bears where he connected on 76 of 152 attempts while drilling 154 of 160 extra points. He did play one season for the Denver Broncos in 1967 before retiring.
  • 1985: Joe Shield (QB): Shielf was selected by the New York Giants with the 44th pick in the fifth round. The Brattleboro, Vermont native played just three games with the Packers during the 1986 season.

Tufts University 

  • 1946: George Feldman (HB): Feldman was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 208th pick in the 22nd round.
  • 1958: George Kurker (T): Kurker was selected by the New York Giants with the 149th pick in the 13th round.
  • 1977: Daryl Brown (DB): Brown was picked 240th in the ninth round by the Cleveland Browns.

UMass Boston

  • 1974: Erle Garrett (DB): The only student-athlete to be drafted in UMass Boston’s history, Garrett was selected by the Minnesota Vikings with the 441st pick in the 17th round.

University of New Haven

  • 1958: Lou Pitney (C): Pitney was drafted by the New York Giants with the 345th pick in the 29th round.
  • 1959: Dick Splain (T): Splain was selected by the Washington Redskins with the 185th pick in the 16th round.
  • 1982: Mile McPherson (DB): McPherson was selected by the Los Angeles Rams with the 256th pick in the 10th round. The Queens, New York native never played a down for the Rams but did play four seasons for the San Diego Chargers while playing in two postseason games against the Miami Dolphins and Pittsburgh Steelers.
  • 1991: Harry Boatswain (G): Boatswain was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers with the 137th pick in the fifth round. The Brooklyn, New York native played began his five-year career with the 49ers before competing for the Philadelphia Eagles in 1995 and the New York Jets in 1996. He also competed in seven postseason games, including four contests against the Dallas Cowboys.

Wesleyan University 

  • 1947: Burt VanderClute (G): Vander Clute was picked 69th overall in the ninth round by the Pittsburgh Steelers.
  • 1947: Jack Medd (C): Medd was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers with the 89th pick in the 11th round.
  • 1948: Jim Burton (E): Burton was drafted by the Boston Yanks with the 69th pick in the ninth round.
  • 1949: John Geary (T): Geary was selected by the New York Bulldogs with the 93rd pick in the 10th round.

Williams College

  • 1970: Jack Maitland (RB): Maitland was selected by the Baltimore Colts with the 408th pick in the 16th round. The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania native played just one season for the Colts, starting two of the 14 games. He rushed for 209 yards on 74 carries for one score while catching nine passes for 67 yards and one touchdown. One year later, Maitland suited up for the New England Patriots where he played for the hometown team in 1971 and 1972.
  • 1976: Scott Perry (DB): Perry was picked 147th overall in the fifth round by the Cincinnati Bengals. The Pleasanton, California native played four seasons with the Bengals before ending his career with both the San Diego Chargers and San Francisco 49ers. Perry played in two postseason games in 1981 with the Chargers.
  • 1996: Ethan Brooks (T): Brooks was selected 229th overall in the seventh round by the Atlanta Falcons. Brooks played seven seasons of professional football, including three with the Baltimore Ravens from 2002-04.

 

Daily Noontime: Friday, March 20th, 2020

DNMarch20th2020

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to Friday (or as we like to call it, Fri-yay!).

It has been quite the week – when will the new normal end? – but like I did yesterday, I will continue to produce a ‘Daily Noontime’ going forward with hopes of putting a smile on everyone’s faces during this unique time (and the life we’re living these days).

Alright, it is official: Tom Brady is officially a member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

In a release (and story this morning from the Buccaneers’ website), the team’s General Manager Jason Licht said Brady will “immediately impact our entire organization.”

Indeed, Brady will make an impact on the Bucs, who finished their 2019 season with seven wins and nine losses.

But doesn’t it seem strange (or bizarre) to think Brady will end his historic career with the Buccaneers? I mean, I think so, but Joe Montana ended his career, not with the San Francisco 49ers, but the Kansas City Chiefs. Again, this just seems weird, but again, we’re living in unusual times.

So, with no Brady under center, it is time to embrace Jarrett Stidham, but maybe we should also Jameis Winston, too. ESPN’s Jeremy Fowler thinks (and believes) that the former Buccaneers quarterback could be an ideal replacement for the Patriots, but do we really want a quarterback that threw 30 touchdowns and 30 interceptions last season?

In other National Football League (NFL) news, the “stay at home” order in California could impact the completion of SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles. The new home of the Los Angeles Chargers and Los Angeles Rams was supposed to be ready for the upcoming season, but due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), the “stay at home” order could mean a delay on the league’s new crown jewel.

In an interesting op-ed piece from the Los Angeles Times, there is a thought of building a people mover to the stadium, along with the shops and office space, which will be built nearby. Not a bad idea and it would decrease traffic, too.

Let’s switch gears to some quick hitters (and what occurred on this date in the past few months, years, and decades), beginning with wishing Bobby Orr a happy birthday!

On This Date in History: 

  • 1934: Babe Didrikson Zaharias pitched one inning in a Major League Baseball (MLB) spring training game for the Philadelphia Athletics. She gave up one walk but not hits in a single frame against the Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • 1965: UCLA beat Michigan in the 27th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship.
  • 1973: Roberto Clemente was elected to the MLB 11 weeks after his death in a plane crash.
  • 1989: Baseball announced former Cincinnati Reds manager Pete Rose is under investigation for betting on baseball games.
  • 1990: The Los Angeles Lakers retired Kareem Abdul-Jabbar‘s number (No. 33).

As usual, please be well and be safe, take care of your family, and we’ll have more content on Brady (and some other topics) later today and this weekend! 

Noontime Commentary: Five Potential Landing Spots For Tom Brady

ca-times.brightspotcdn

Where will Tom Brady play in 2020? PHOTO COURTESY: Charles Krupa / Associated Press/LA Times

By Matt Noonan 

It may be only February – Friday, February 14th, 2020, to be exact – but the thought of where Tom Brady will play next season continues to be on the minds of many, including myself.

So, below are five potential landing spots for the six-time Super Bowl champion – I am sure all five of these teams, including the New England Patriots, would certainly benefit from having Brady both in their locker room and on the field guiding their respective offense.

Dallas Cowboys: The Cowboys begin a new era under head coach Mike McCarthy. And you know the former Green Bay Packers coach would love to have a veteran quarterback like Brady to guide his offense to not just a division crown, but also a Super Bowl championship.

Dallas may have their quarterback of the future in Dak Prescott, but it seems as if he and his agent want a lot of money for a signal-caller that has yet to guide the Silver and Blue to a conference title. Prescott is 1-2 in the postseason, and does not seem interested in attending minicamp and possibly training camp until he receives what he wants, so why not lure Brady to Texas so the Cowboys can win their sixth (and possibly seventh) Super Bowl in franchise history.

Las Vegas Raiders: Could you imagine Tom Brady donning a Silver and Black uniform? If so, I’ll buy it – I don’t wear jerseys anymore – but with Brady under center, he would immediately turn the Raiders into a team that would not only compete with the Kansas City Chiefs for an AFC West crown but also a conference championship.

The Raiders begin a new era in their franchise history this fall – sadly, they are not competing in Oakland or Los Angeles anymore, so adding Brady to their roster for one or two years would be an ideal way to start the next chapter of Raider Nation.

New England Patriots: Returning to the Patriots makes the most sense to me, but I am not entirely sure if Brady would want to play for New England, especially with how this past season concluded.

Sure, the Patriots weren’t “loaded” or the team to beat this past fall as they relied more on their defense than their offense, but if Brady were to return then I think coach Bill Belichick would need to lure some marquee free agents to Gillette Stadium so the veteran signal-caller can have a chance to end his career with at least one or two more Super Bowls.

Tennessee Titans: The Titans’ postseason run was exciting. But imagine what it will be like next year with Tom Brady under center?

If Brady joins the Titans then consider them the team to beat in the AFC besides the Kansas City Chiefs and the Baltimore Ravens.

Most likely, Ryan Tannehill will return to Tennessee, but I could see Brady’s former teammate and current head coach Mike Vrabel finding a way to lure the veteran signal-caller to Nashville.

San Francisco 49ers: This would be an ideal way to end a historic career.

Brady, as we all know, grew up rooting for the 49ers, so why not find a way to end your career with your favorite team. And I am sure both Kyle Shanahan and John Lynch would love to have Brady compete for a team that is certainly capable of returning to the Super Bowl next season.

For this move to happen, Brady could do one of two things. He could sign with the 49ers once free agency begins next month or ink his name on a new deal with the Patriots, but then ask either Bill Belichick or Robert Kraft to trade him to San Francisco. And if the Patriots did trade Brady, then you can bet that Belichick would ask for Jimmy Garoppolo in return.

I know this sounds like a crazy idea and I doubt the 49ers want to give up on Jimmy G,  but if Brady were to sign with the 49ers then he will certainly have a chance to end his career with at least one, possibly two, Super Bowl rings.


Stay connected with Matt Noonan on Instagram and Twitter