Tag: MIAA

MIAA Waives Masks For Outdoor Sports; Masks For Some Indoors

Massachusetts high school lacrosse players will no longer need to wear masks under their helmets or on the sidelines, per today’s announcement from the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA). (PHOTO COURTESY: Matt Noonan/NoontimeSports.com)

By Matt Noonan

Following yesterday’s announcement from Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker about lifting Covid-19 restrictions next Saturday, May 29, the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) issued a statement this morning that masks and facial covers will no longer be required for those competing outdoors.

The MIAA Sports Medicine Committee (SMC) “voted unanimously” to approve the guidelines the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) unveiled yesterday that would allow both youth and amateur sports participants to “no longer require face coverings for youth athletes 18 and under while playing outdoors.” The remaining restrictions will be lifted effectively on May 29.

In addition to no longer needing a face mask or covering while competing outside, student-athletes will no longer need to wear them on the bench or in a dugout. Those that compete in low-risk sports indoors will not have to wear a mask or face covering as long they can maintain at least 14 feet or more from other participants. Face masks and coverings will be required for those attending indoor events such as boy’s volleyball matches but not needed for outdoor contests, pending fans can safely distance themselves from others.

Excluding today’s decision on masks and facial coverings, no changes will be made to the MIAA sports modifications. However, the governing body of Massachusetts high school sports did say they would review the EEA guidelines as restrictions are lifted.

Three MIAA Games Highlight Week Seven Of The Spring Football Season

By NoontimeSports.com

For those us from Massachusetts, the acronym MIAA is often associated with the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association but it is also used to abreviate the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. And this weekend, six MIAA teams will be in action with two games scheduled for Saturday, March 20 while Kalamazoo College and Olivet College will cap the weekend with an early afternoon kickoff on Sunday, March 21.

Hope College, which won the MIAA conference crown in 2019, will not be competing this weekend or spring, but will use this time to prepare for their initial fall contest against Anderson University on September 4.

Here are this weekend’s matchups:

  • Albion College at Trine University (Saturday, March 20 at 1 p.m. est.)
  • Adrian College at Alma College (Saturday, March 20 at 1 p.m. est.)
  • Kalamazoo College at Olivet College (Sunday, March 21 at 1 p.m. est.)

The Thunder of Trine enter the seventh week of the spring season with a perfect 2-0 record – they scored wins last October against Adrian (44-27) and Manchester University (37-0), and will attempt to capture their third-straight victory on Saturday, as well as their first win against Albion since 2018. Albion won the previous meeting in 2019 by a score of 24-14.

Similar to Trine, Adrian also competed last fall, appearing in three contests while securing an early October victory against Manchester (41-10). The Bulldogs enter their first spring game with a 1-2 record with hopes of evening the mark against an Alma squad they edged in 2019 by a score of 34-31.

Albion enters the spring season as the favorite, according to the MIAA preseason coaches poll, which was released earlier this month. The Britons secured five of six first-place votes while Olivet, which garnered one first-place selection, is projected to finish second. Trine rounded out the top three sports while Adrian and Alma are projected to finish fourth, respectively, while Kalamazoo rounded out the poll in the sixth position.

The MIAA’s spring season will run from this weekend to Saturday, April 17.


News and notes from the spring college football world

  • The Upper Midwest Athletic Conference (UMAC) spring season will kickoff this weekend with Greenville University visiting DePauw University. Saturday’s matchup with Greenville will be the Tigers’ final contest of the 2020-21 school year. – DePauw beat Ohio Wesleyan University last September before beating The College of Wooster. DePauw’s meeting with Wooster was an exhibition contest.
  • In case you missed it, four New Jersey Athletic Conference (NJAC) teams kicked-off their spring seasons last weekend. William Patterson, which was initially scheduled to play last Saturday against Christopher Newport, will play its first game this Saturday, March 20 against Kean University. Kickoff between the two teams is scheduled for 12 p.m.
  • In honor of March Madness, ESPN asked the following question: what would a 64-team postseason bracket look like 2021? It is certainly an interesting read, but something we know (and sadly, most college fans do, as well) won’t happen.
  • The college football world has changed because of Covid-19, according to Chip Kelly, who believes Zoom will be something coaches will continue to use going forward, especially when connecting with recruits.
  • Last weekend was a busy weekend of NCAA D-II football – are you ready for more games this week?
  • Congratulations to former Fordham University quarterback Mike Nebrich, who has been inducted into the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame.

MIAA BOD Provides A Glimmer Of Hope For High School Student-Athletes

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High school soccer will occur this fall, but it will look different. (PHOTO COURTESY: Matt Noonan/NoontimeSports.com)

By Matt Noonan 

Credit is due to not just the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) Board of Directors and Covid-19 Task Force, but everyone that has been working tirelessly these past few months to provide our state’s high school student-athletes with some sense of normalcy during these unprecedented times.

Wednesday’s unanimous decision by the MIAA Board of Directors to accept plans for a four-season model by the Covid-19 Task Force, including the opportunity to play football next February, should be seen as a positive. But as we know, there is still a lot of work to be done as we inch closer to the official start of a new fall season, which will look quite different than years past.

As of today, the 2020 fall sports season will begin Monday, September 18 for the following sports: soccer, gymnastics, cross-country, field hockey, girl’s volleyball, swimming and diving, and golf. And just to be clear, the start date listed above means practices, not games.

Each contest, match, and meet will look quite different. And that is because we’re living in pandemic so don’t be surprised if the soccer committee completely rewrites the rules we’re accustomed to like header, throw-ins, and slide tackles, so every participant, including coaches and officials, can feel safe on the pitch.

Modifications for each sport, which are due next Tuesday, August 25, must aline with the state’s current guidelines for Youth and Adult Amateur Sports Activities established by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA)

According to Jim Clark of the Boston Globe, the Covid-19 Task Force will review the modifications and tweaks submitted by each sport’s committee next week “for final consideration by (Jeff) Granatino and MIAA executive director Bill Gaine by Sept. 1.”

As we anxiously await for future announcements – and yes, news and notes on Twitter – I feel it is best to stop and appreciate the hard work by these men and women, who have provided our state’s student-athletes with the hope of better days to come with a return to play format.

Yes, there is still a slew of questions that need to be answered with a new fall sports season on the horizon. There will also be new wrinkles to the current plan in place, too, but as we learned last week from our friend in Connecticut, the current situation is fluid and things could change because of the coronavirus.

But for now, our state has plans in place for a brand new high school sports season, which should put a smile on everyone’s face. And while the upcoming school year and yes, athletic year, too, will be rather unique, it will be a story many of us will be eager to tell our children and grandchildren when questions about the coronavirus pandemic are brought up in the future. And as someone that loves to tell stories, I will be excited – is excited the right word? – to share my experience.

MIAA, RIIL Cancels Spring Sports

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Four New England states have canceled high school spring sports. (VISUALHUNT.com)

By Matt Noonan 

Both Massachusetts and Rhode Island joined Maine and New Hampshire by canceling its state’s spring high school sports season this afternoon.

The Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) and Rhode Island Interscholastic League (RIIL) both shared this news on their respective Twitter accounts.

Both states are abiding by the advice of Governors Charlie Baker and Gina Raimondo, who have ordered both Massachusetts and Rhode Island to conclude their respective academic schools years online, not in-person.

Connecticut has not canceled its spring sports season, but the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) announced yesterday they will “not run any spring state championship events.” The CIAC could, however, have a regular-season in June, but that would only occur if schools reopen. Connecticut is not scheduled to reopen until May 20.

The Vermont Principals’ Association (VPA) will make an announcement regarding its spring sports season on Thursday, April 30.

Maine and New Hampshire announced the cancelations of its states’ spring sports season earlier this month.

Springs Sports In Massachusetts Will Most Likely Not Happen

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Could Massachusetts see a high school spring sports season? (PHOTO COURTESY: Visualhunt.com)

By Matt Noonan

With yesterday’s announcement by Governor Charlie Baker regarding schools remaining online (and remote) for the remainder of the school year due to COVID-19, it seems most likely that a spring high school sports season will not occur. But an official announcement has not yet been made by the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) as of late this morning.

Hours after Baker’s announcement of both private and public schools remaining closed for the remainder of the academic school year, the MIAA tweeted the following yesterday afternoon: “Difficult news received from Governor Baker today. A formal MIAA BOD statement regarding the status of 2020 spring sports will be provided by weeks end.”

While high school athletic directors, coaches, and student-athletes, as well as fans, eagerly await an official announcement from the MIAA, it seems most likely that Massachusetts will become the third New England state to cancel its spring sports season like Maine and New Hampshire did earlier this month.

Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Vermont have not canceled its spring high school sports seasons, but perhaps yesterday’s news by Baker could result in more cancelations across the region, along with schools not being open until possibly next fall.

The MIAA canceled its basketball and hockey winter championships last month, naming both state finalists as co-champions.