Daily Noontime: Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to April 1st, everyone – how is everyone doing?

We know this is going to be a tough month with the coronavirus (COVID-19), but we will be here providing both relief and some fun content.

And that content, which we deem fun (and enjoyable) begins today with our first ‘Daily Noontime’ for the month of April!


Noontime’s Headlines for Wednesday, April 1st, 2020 


On this Date in History 

  • 1999: Philadelphia 76ers coach Larry Brown wins his 900th professional game with an 88-84 win over the Miami Heat.
  • 2002: The University of Maryland men’s basketball team won its first-ever national championship in school history with a 64-52 win over Indiana in the 64th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship.
  • 2008: The New York Yankees set an MLB record by winning their 11th straight home opener with a 3-2 victory against the Toronto Blue Jays.
  • 2016: The Golden State Warriors‘ home winning streak of 54 games was snapped by the Boston Celtics. Boston won the game by a score of 109-106.

Noontime’s Sunday Sports Movies

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

It’s a rainy Sunday, which means many of us, including myself, will be searching for a good movie to watch – maybe two (or three)?

And some of us, like myself, may want to watch a sports movie since there are no live games on television due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

So, with many of us searching for a new or old movie to watch this morning or afternoon, here are some suggestions from Noontime Sports, enjoy!

42. Hands down, this is one of my favorite baseball movies. I actually watched this film last weekend – it fills your baseball void, I swear!

Travel back to the late 1940s to learn about Jackie Robinson‘s first season with the Brooklyn Dodgers, which saw the Blue and White win the National League and advance to the 1947 World Series against the New York Yankees.

The Express. Sticking the historical theme – I majored in American Studies, so I love history! – jump back in time with your football and shoulder pads to learn about Ernie Davis, who was the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy.

Davis, who is played by Rob Brown, is recruited to play college football at Syracuse University by both head coach Ben Schwartzwalder (Dennis Quaid) and Jim Brown, who is one of the greatest halfbacks in the National Football League (NFL).

Miracle. So, I am currently reading Mike Eruzione‘s The Making of a Miracle, which means I will probably watch this movie once I finish. And if you are craving some hockey with the National Hockey League (NHL) at a standstill, then consider cheering on the 1980 U.S.A. men’s team, which defeated both the Soviet Union and Finland to win the gold medal at the Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York.

The Replacements. Alright, let’s switch gears from historical movies to a comedy.

Gene Hackman inherits a team of replacements during a professional football strike that needs to win three of its final four contests to reach the playoffs. And for the team to reach the postseason, Hackman will need quarterback Shane Falco, who is played by Keanu Reeves, to guide his offense.

Space Jam. Missing basketball, especially the Boston Celtics, then consider rooting for the Tune Squad, which is made up of some of your favorite Looney Tunes characters, as well as … Michael Jordan.

61*. Director Billy Crystal, who happens to be a die-hard New York Yankees fan, takes you back to 1961 when both Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle begin their respective quests to break Babe Ruth‘s 1927 single-season home run record.

Draft Day. We’re 25 days away from the 2020 NFL Draft, so get ready to celebrate your team’s initial pick by seeing who the Cleveland Browns will select in the 2014 Draft. Kevin Costner, who is the team’s general manager, seems to know his team needs a bit more than newly acquired head coach Denis Leary.

Additional movies to watch:

  • Moneyball (baseball)
  • The Blind Side (football)
  • Invictus (rugby)
  • Glory Road (basketball)
  • Coach Carter (basketball)
  • Million Dollar Baby (boxing)
  • Cinderella Man (boxing)
  • Remember the Titans (football)
  • Slap Shot (hockey)
  • A League of Their Own (baseball)
  • Hoosiers (basketball)
  • Bull Durham (baseball)
  • The Mighty Ducks (hockey)
  • Rudy (football)
  • The Sandlot (baseball)
  • Eight Men Out (baseball)
  • Field of Dreams (baseball)
  • Happy Gilmore (golf)

As always, be well, stay safe, and think optimistically, friends – we will continue to get through this time and we’ll be back soon with some new content! 

Daily Noontime: Thursday, March 26th, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

It’s Thursday – hope everyone is doing well and staying safe as usual!

Let’s make today another great day – remember to smile, please! – with a brand new ‘Daily Noontime.’


Noontime’s Headlines for Thursday, March 26th, 2020


On This Date in History

  • 1952: Kansas beat St. John’s in the 14th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship – the tournament featured the first-ever “Final Four” format.
  • 1979: Michigan State beat Indiana State, 75-64, in the 41st NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship, which was the highest-rated game in the history of televised college basketball. And what made this game so special (and exciting) was it started the rivalry of future NBA Hall of Famers Magic Johnson and Larry Bird.
  • 1992: The New York Rangers clinched its first NHL regular-season championship in 50 years.
  • 1997: The NHL announced the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and Vancouver Canucks would open the 1998 season in Japan.

Daily Noontime: Friday, March 20th, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to Friday (or as we like to call it, Fri-yay!).

It has been quite the week – when will the new normal end? – but like I did yesterday, I will continue to produce a ‘Daily Noontime’ going forward with hopes of putting a smile on everyone’s faces during this unique time (and the life we’re living these days).

Alright, it is official: Tom Brady is officially a member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

In a release (and story this morning from the Buccaneers’ website), the team’s General Manager Jason Licht said Brady will “immediately impact our entire organization.”

Indeed, Brady will make an impact on the Bucs, who finished their 2019 season with seven wins and nine losses.

But doesn’t it seem strange (or bizarre) to think Brady will end his historic career with the Buccaneers? I mean, I think so, but Joe Montana ended his career, not with the San Francisco 49ers, but the Kansas City Chiefs. Again, this just seems weird, but again, we’re living in unusual times.

So, with no Brady under center, it is time to embrace Jarrett Stidham, but maybe we should also Jameis Winston, too. ESPN’s Jeremy Fowler thinks (and believes) that the former Buccaneers quarterback could be an ideal replacement for the Patriots, but do we really want a quarterback that threw 30 touchdowns and 30 interceptions last season?

In other National Football League (NFL) news, the “stay at home” order in California could impact the completion of SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles. The new home of the Los Angeles Chargers and Los Angeles Rams was supposed to be ready for the upcoming season, but due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), the “stay at home” order could mean a delay on the league’s new crown jewel.

In an interesting op-ed piece from the Los Angeles Times, there is a thought of building a people mover to the stadium, along with the shops and office space, which will be built nearby. Not a bad idea and it would decrease traffic, too.

Let’s switch gears to some quick hitters (and what occurred on this date in the past few months, years, and decades), beginning with wishing Bobby Orr a happy birthday!

On This Date in History: 

  • 1934: Babe Didrikson Zaharias pitched one inning in a Major League Baseball (MLB) spring training game for the Philadelphia Athletics. She gave up one walk but not hits in a single frame against the Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • 1965: UCLA beat Michigan in the 27th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship.
  • 1973: Roberto Clemente was elected to the MLB 11 weeks after his death in a plane crash.
  • 1989: Baseball announced former Cincinnati Reds manager Pete Rose is under investigation for betting on baseball games.
  • 1990: The Los Angeles Lakers retired Kareem Abdul-Jabbar‘s number (No. 33).

As usual, please be well and be safe, take care of your family, and we’ll have more content on Brady (and some other topics) later today and this weekend! 

Commentary: Are You Ready For Life Without Sports?

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Are you ready for life without sports? (PHOTO COURTESY: CubesAndPiii on Visual Hunt / CC BY-ND)

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation

Get ready for a few weeks and months without sports – it is going to happen.

Due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), both this week and over the past few weeks, sports are going to take a backseat. And I am fine with that decision.

The health and well-being of our athletes, coaches, team representatives, and of course, the fans, is what matters most during this time.

I know many fans are upset – what will I do without sports? – while others believe the games (and practices) must go on. But I believe the only way we can return to the field and bleachers is by adhering to the advice of our doctors, health officials, and scientists, not angry parents or fans.

The decision to halt professional, college and high school sports was certainly not an easy one, but again, this decision, a domino effect on Thursday after the NBA suspended its season late Wednesday evening, was the right thing to do. And again, I know many, including college and high school seniors, were extremely distraught to hear their dreams of competing for a March Madness title or state championship would not occur, so I sympathize with these men and women, including the high school seniors that may not get a chance to compete this spring on the baseball or softball diamond or even the school’s outdoor track.

So, with really no local games or college basketball to watch today, tomorrow, and Sunday, I guess it is time to embark into a world that won’t include sports, but instead concerns over the well-being of our family, friends, colleagues, and neighbors.

Will we read more books?

Will we binge-watch, both old and new shows?

Will we get outside and soak in the sun (when its nice, of course)?

Or will we just hunker down and wait for the apocalypse of the coronavirus to vanish?

No matter what happens, life will be different – I guarantee it – but as I mentioned earlier today in my ‘Daily Noontime,’ we will persevere and come back stronger. And that is because I am an optimist.

While I know many of you may find life quite boring and odd these next few weeks and months without sports, just remember that our favorite teams and athletes will eventually reemerge. But until that time comes, we just need to smile, laugh, and find something else to do to keep us preoccupied while we anxiously await the return of professional, college, and high school sports.