Tag: National Football League

Chris Hogan Thinks Paul Rabil Could Go From PLL To NFL

Chris Hogan, who played ten seasons in the NFL, recently secure a spot on the Cannons Lacrosse Club of the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL). (PHOTO COURTESY: NFL.com)

By Matt Noonan

Chris Hogan made headlines earlier this year when he elected to swap his football pads for a lacrosse stick.

Hogan, who won two Super Bowls with the New England Patriots, secured a spot earlier this month on the Cannons Lacrosse Club of the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL) but did not suit up this weekend. However, he was on the sidelines supporting his teammates this afternoon en route to their first-ever PLL win against the Waterdogs Lacrosse Club while discussing his experience thus far with NBC‘s Paul Burmeister.

One question Burmeister asked was a fun, what-if/hypothetical questions — he wanted to know which of his Cannons teammates was “best suited” to go from the PLL to the National Football League (NFL).

Of course, there are a few that come to mind, but Hogan named Paul Rabil, who is a co-founder of the PLL with his brother Mike Rabil. He described the veteran midfielder as “big, physical, runs hard, (and) probably could play offense or defense.”

“All these guys are good athletes, and I know a lot of them played two sports,” Hogan said to Burmeister. “I mean, I think Paul gave it a second thought there for a little while.”

While it’s unknown if Rabil wanted to play in the NFL, especially earlier this year, he did tell Rich Eisen that Patriots coach Bill Belichick did try to convince him to try out for the team when he was younger.

“We went back and forth — this was when I was 23 and I was the captain of Team USA at the time and we kind of came to an agreement that it was the best decision to stay in lacrosse,” Rabil said during a recent interview on The Rich Eisen Show.

It would have been fun to see Rabil and Hogan compete for the Patriots, especially with Tom Brady, but for now, they can focus on winning a championship later this summer/early fall.

Commentary: Adam Vinatieri Is The NFL’s Best Placekicker Of All-Time

Former New England Patriots kicker Adam Vinatieri announced his retirement from the NFL on Wednesday, May 26, 2021. (PHOTO COURTESY: Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images/ESPN.com)

By Matt Noonan

Tom Brady and Bill Belichick will always be synonymous with the New England Patriots, but the same could be said for Adam Vinatieri, who announced his retirement from the National Football League (NFL) yesterday on The Pat McAfee Show

Vinatieri, like Brady and Belichick, helped the Patriots win their first-ever Super Bowl championship against the St. Louis Rams in 2002 — he clinched the win with a last-second field goal weeks after splitting the uprights twice in a snowy postseason affair with the Oakland Raiders. He would win three more championships over the next five years, including one with the Indianapolis Colts in 2007 (the victory marked the first of two titles for quarterback Peyton Manning, who would win his second Super Bowl with the Denver Broncos in 2016). 

The Yankton, South Dakota native has garnered multiple accolades throughout his career, including a trio of First-Team All-Pro honors along with a spot on three historic rosters: New England Patriots 50th Anniversary Team, NFL 2000s All-Decade Team, and NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team. He is currently the league’s all-time scoring leader (2,673 points) and holds numerous kicking records, including the most consecutive field goals made (44).

So, between his accolades and records, along with his four Super Bowl rings, is it fair to say Vinatieri is the best placekicker in NFL History?

My answer: Yes, he is, but some may disagree and say that Morten Andersen (2,544 all-time points) and Gary Anderson (2,434 all-time points) deserve some consideration as the best placekicker in league history.

Neither Andersen nor Anderson has won a Super Bowl, but they both competed for nearly three decades. Vinatieri kicked extra points and field goals for 24 years.

Andersen was inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 2017 — he is also a member of the New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame and ranks second in the league in games played (382). He converted 565 of 709 field-goal attempts and was close to perfect when it came to extra points (849 out of 859 attempts). Andersen kicked for five teams but spent most of his career with the Saints.

Anderson has yet to be inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame but should hear his name called one of these days especially after tallying 1,343 points with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Four years after he left the Steelers, he enjoyed one of his best seasons with the Minnesota Vikings where he converted every extra point and field goal attempt in the regular season. His streak would conclude in the 1998 NFC Championship Game when he missed a 38-yard field goal late in the fourth quarter. The Atlanta Falcons capitalized on the missed field goal by scoring a game-tying touchdown on the ensuing possession. Morten Andersen would cap the comeback with a game-winning field goal in overtime.

Similar to Andersen, Anderson competed for five teams. He spent most of his career with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1982-1994).

All three kickers enjoyed successful careers, but after a quick stroll down memory lane, I still believe Adam Vinatieri is the best placekicker of all time. Had Morten Andersen won at least one — OK, maybe two Super Bowls, then maybe you could say it is a toss-up. Perhaps he would have earned more postseason honors, as well? But based on statistics and four Super Bowl titles, along with being the all-time scoring leader (as of this afternoon), I think it is fair to say that Vinatieri will always be the NFL’s best placekicker.

Noontime Celebrate 12-Years Of Blogging

By NoontimeSports.com

12-years ago, our journey — well, more the story of Noontime Sports officially began. And it has been quite a ride.

Our sports media journey officially began on a humid afternoon on May 14, 2009, with a post about Greg Paulus, who played college basketball at Duke University and football at Syracuse University as a graduate student. He did attempt to earn a roster spot with the New Orleans Saints in 2010 but sadly did not make the cut.

Since our initial post, our blog has featured a variety of posts on many topics — we would say a lot of the content centers around Boston sports, New England colleges and high schools, and sometimes, the National Football League (NFL).

In addition to blogs, we have produced a ton of videos that can be seen on our YouTube channel and have hosted a slew of podcasts — last year, we shifted our show from WordPress to Anchor, and our podcast can be heard on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.

Four years ago, we produced a video about eight years of blogging — and yes, creating content — but we’re proud to celebrate 12-years with our fans and friends. It has not been an easy 14 months with so many local (and regional) sports offline (or on the sidelines until this winter or early spring) due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but we’re optimistic and excited to return to covering games in-person next month while generating ideas for fall sports coverage.

As we begin this exciting next chapter, we want to thank our fans, followers, and friends — your support means so much to us, and we truly appreciate you stopping by the site once, twice or a few times each week while engaging with our various posts on social media. We love producing content on a variety of sports topics and plan to do it for a very long time.

So, here is to the next step — the next chapter, to be exact! — and we look forward to having you join us on what should be an exciting post-pandemic ride filled with some exciting memories and moments.

Noontime’s Black History Month: Jim Brown

By NoontimeSports.com

Our Black History Month weekday posts that honor the men and women, who have and continue to make an impact on the sports – and yes, athletics world – continues today with getting to know Jim Brown.

Jim Brown is considered one of the greatest to play professional football. (PHOTO COURTESY: Biography.com)

Jim Brown is considered by many as one of the greatest to play professional football – he was also a tremendous lacrosse player, too.

Like we have earlier this week, let’s get to know Jim Brown more, as well as share some must-reads on the former Cleveland Browns halfback.

Getting to know Jim Brown:

  • Jim Brown maybe known for his playing days with the Cleveland Browns, but he is also a sports analyst and actor. He was also a part owner of the New York Lizards, who used to be a member of Major League Lacrosse (The MLL was absorbed by the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL) last December).
  • Brown was born in St. Simmons Island, Georgia – his father, Swinton Brown, was a professional boxer. He attended Manhasset Secondary School where he earned 13 varsity letters for playing football, lacrosse, baseball, basketball, and running track. His success on the playing field continued as a student-athlete at Syracuse University where he became an All-American in football and lacrosse. He was the men’s basketball team’s top scorer and finished fifth in the college decathlon.
  • With the Orange, Brown received the nickname “First Down Brown,” and recorded quite a few first downs against Colgate University in 1956 when he scored six touchdowns and recorded seven extra points.

    During that same season, he tallied 21 points against Boston University before posting the same amount against Texas Christian in the Cotton Bowl. TCU won the 1957 Cotton Bowl by a score of 28-27, but Jim Brown was named the game’s Most Valuable Player.
  • Jim Brown played nine seasons in the National Football League (NFL) – all nine were spent with the Cleveland Browns – and tallied 12,312 rushing yards, including 1,863 yards in 1963. He also scored 106 touchdowns in 1963.
  • A one-time NFL champion with the Cleveland Browns in 1964 when they beat the Baltimore Colts, Brown is a nine-time pro bowler, eight-time first-team all-pro, and earned a trio of AP NFL Most Valuable Player awards in 1957, 1958, and 1965. He was tabbed the NFL’s Rookie of the Year in 1957, and led the league in rushing eight times (1957-1961 and 1963-1965.
  • Brown retired from the NFL during the summer of 1966 – his decision stunned the football world as many wondered what he would have accomplished had he played another nine seasons. But something worth noting, he never missed a single game with the Cleveland Browns.
  • After retiring from football, Brown starred in numerous movies and became the first African American to announce a televised boxing match. He founded the Amer-I-Can Program, a national program that is focused on empowering individuals to “take charge of their lives and achieve their full potential.”
  • Jim Brown was named to the NFL’s All-Time Team in November 2019.

Articles and Links on Jim Brown:

We’ll be back next Monday for another week of our Black History Month sports posts!

Daily Noontime: Wednesday, February 3, 2021

By Matt Noonan

Welcome to our late afternoon edition of the Daily Noontime!

We’re posting a bit later than usual – we apologize for the delay, but will be back tomorrow morning with some news and links to kickstart your day. But for now, enjoy a late-afternoon (and yes, early evening) edition of the Daily Noontime.


Tom Brady speaks to the media: Before he takes the field next Sunday, February 7, 2021, for what will be his tenth Super Bowl appearance, Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady answered a slew of questions from the media today, including his relationship with wide receiver Antonio Brown.

You can watch the entire interview below, as well as hear other interviews by visiting the Buccaneers’ YouTube channel.

Here are a few more Super Bowl links:

  • In case you missed it, Electronic Arts is “bringing back” its college football game, which was discontinued after it released NCAA Football 14 in 2013.

Finally, Noontime Sports is celebrating Black History Month with a daily post on the men and women who have and continue to make an impact the sports world.

Today, we highlighted Bobby Marshall, who is one of the first African American’s to play professional football.