Tag: NBA Finals

Daily Noontime (Wednesday, September 30, 2020)

By Matt Noonan 

It’s the final day of September – man, this month moved quickly! I guess it is time to begin the countdown for Halloween, right? 

We hope it has been a great month for you (and your families), as well as your friends – we have enjoyed hosting a slew of podcasts to generating some new content on football and other subjects over the past few weeks. And as we head into the final stretch of 2020, we’re excited to produce even more football content, along with some other blogs, podcasts, and videos, so stay tuned, Noontime fans and friends! 

Alright, let’s kickstart a brand new day with the ‘Daily Noontime’ for Wednesday, September 30, 2020 – have a great day, everyone! 

NFL vs. Covid-19

News broke yesterday morning regarding the National Football League‘s (NFL) enduring its first official coronavirus hurdle with eight members of the Tennessee Titans, including three players testing positive.

Both the Titans and Minnesota Vikings, who was Tennessee’s most recent opponent, have closed their respective facilities and will be working remotely this week – how do you work remotely in professional sports? I don’t know, but I am guessing there will be a LOT of Zoom meetings. 

As of now, it appears both teams will be back on the field this weekend but stay tuned. 

Just a short time ago, we learned of fourth player testing positive, which is NOT good news. However, no member of the Vikings tested positive, which is good news, right? 

Two former Harvard University football players start a $55 million sports-focused venture fund

Just a short time ago, Scott Soshnick of Sportico reported that two former Harvard football alums, including Isaiah Kacyvenski, who was one of the founders of the Sports Innovation Lab here in Boston, has formed a team to start “the first early stage, institutionally-backed ventured fund.”

The firm believes sports will fuel “the next great wave of technological innovation,” and we certainly will be keeping our eyes on this group, which was raised $55 million has some impressive partnerships in place already.

The 2020 NBA Finals tips-off this evening

LeBron James and the Los Angeles Lakers will compete against the Miami Heat this evening in game one of the 2020 National Basketball Association (NBA) Finals.

James and the Lakers outlasted the Denver Nuggets in the Western Conference Finals, while the Heat beat our beloved Boston Celtics in the Eastern Conference Finals.

Miami enters the championship round with a great deal of momentum and should not be taken lightly. 

But what makes this matchup so intriguing is James used to play for the Heat – remember when promised multiple championships?  

Finally, are you excited for day number two of the MLB playoffs? 

The first official day of the 2020 Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason is in the books. And in case you were curious, the New York Yankees won their first game against the Cleveland Indians

More games are on the docket today, New York-Cleveland, as well as Los Angeles DodgersMilwaukee Brewers at 10 p.m. eastern. 

While it is upsetting to not see the local nine in the playoffs – that would be the Boston Red Sox – it is nice to have playoff baseball on your television! 

Sports History: Boston Tops Los Angeles, Wins Sixth NBA Championship

By NoontimeSports.com 

It was on this date 57 years ago (April 24, 1963) when the Boston Celtics captured yet another NBA Championship by beating the Los Angeles Lakers in six games. Boston outlasted Los Angles, 112-109, in the sixth and final contest of the best of seven game series after capturing the first two meetings in Massachusetts. 

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The Boston Celtics celebrated their sixth NBA Championships on April 24, 1963, by beating the Los Angeles Lakers in six games. (PHOTO COURTESY: NBA.com/Celtics)

Boston was led by the league’s Most Valuable Player Bill Russell, who guided the Green and White to a 58-22 record, as well as the team’s sixth NBA title in seven seasons. The 58 wins was the most victories recorded by any team during the 1962-63 season.

The Celtics postseason run began with an exciting seven-game series against the Cincinnati Royals, who secured a spot in the Eastern Finals after beating the Syracuse Nationals in the Eastern Semifinals (3-2). Sam Jones highlighted his team’s game seven victory over the Royals by scoring a team-high 47 points on 18 of 27 shooting while Tom Heinsohn added 31 points. 

Boston led Cincinnati, 68-64, at the break before outscoing the visitors, 74-67, in the final two sessions to clinch the series and secure a date with Los Angeles.

The Celtics, which beat the Lakers one year earlier in seven contests, won the first two games before Los Angeles won games three and five. Boston won the fourth game, which was held in California, before winning the sixth contest in the same state five days later.

Tom Heinsohn led the Green and White with 22 points on 8 of 18 shooting to go with nine rebounds and two assists while Tom SandersBob Cousy, and John Havlicek each scored 18 points. Los Angeles’ Jerry West led all scorers with 32 points and Elgin Baylor recorded 28 points, eight rebounds, and eight assists.

Boston’s winning ways would continue throughout the decade as they would win five more championships, including the 1969 NBA Finals against the Lakers. Boston needed to win the final two games to clinch the series after Los Angeles won three of five contests.


NoontimeSports.com’s Mia Len contributed to today’s ‘On This Date in History’ sports history post. 

On This Date In History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020

OTDApr11th2020

By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Weekend, everyone!

We hope your Saturday is filled with sunshine (and better weather) compared to earlier this week when we had some rain (and overcast skies).

As usual, we will continue to pump out this post every day with hopes to bring a smile to everyone’s face during this unusual and scary time.

Be well, stay safe, and have a wonderful rest of your morning (and day), everyone!


On This Date in History: Saturday, April 11th, 2020 

  • 1917: Babe Ruth tossed a complete game while recording one run and one hit during four at-bats as the Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees, 10-3, in their season-opener at the Polo Grounds. Ruth retired just one batter of 35 batters he faced while yielding just three runs on three hits to go with three walks. Boston’s Harry Hooper concluded the contest with three runs and three hits.
  • 1961: The Boston Celtics clinched the 1961 NBA Finals series with a 121-112 win over the St. Louis Hawks. Boston, which needed five games to beat the Hawks, was led by Bill Russell, who concluded the game with 30 points and 38 rebounds.
  • 1966: Emmett Ashford became the first African American to umpire a major league baseball game – his first contest was held in Washington D.C. Stadium between the Washington Senators and Cleveland Indians. Ashford was spotted at third base.
  • 1975: Hank Aaron played his first home game with the Milwaukee Brewers since September 22, 1965. Aaron was traded back to Milwaukee from the Atlanta Braves in 1974 – he received a phone call on Saturday, November 2, 1974, from the President of the Brewers, Bud Selig.
  • 1976: Raymond Floyd won his only Masters title by beating runner-up Ben Crenshaw by eight strokes.
  • 1992: The Boston Red Sox needed 19 innings to beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-5, in just their third game of the 1992 season. The win – Boston’s first of the season – spoiled Cleveland’s home opener and was highlighted by a two-run home run in the top of the 19th by Tim Naehring.

    Boston would go onto win 73 games in 1992, but finish seventh in the American League East.

  • 2004: Phil Mickelson won his first major championship – the 68th Masters Tournament – with a birdie on the final hole, which helped him edge runner-up Ernie Els.

Sports History: Boston Sweeps Minneapolis, Wins Its Second NBA Title

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The Boston Celtics won their second NBA Championship on April 9th, 1959 against the Minnesota Lakers. (PHOTO COURTESY: NBA.com/Celtics)

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

The ninth day of April has special meaning to the Boston Celtics. It was on this date 61 years ago that the Green and White celebrated its second NBA Championship with a four-game sweep of the Minneapolis Lakers.

Boston’s win over Minneapolis erased memories of the 1958 NBA Championship, which saw the St. Louis Hawks beat Boston in six games (4-2).

The Celtics entered the 1959 postseason as the top team in the Eastern Division – Boston had won 52 of 72 contests and averaged a league-best 116.4 points per game. Additionally, the 52 wins were the most recorded by any of the eight teams.

Prior to advancing to the franchises’ third-straight NBA Championship, Boston needed all seven contests to beat the Syracuse Nationals in the Eastern Division Finals. Boston won the odd contests – games one, three, five, and seven – while Syracuse captured games two, four, and six.

Bill Russell highlighted his team’s game seven victory over the Nationals by recording a double-double of 18 points and 32 rebounds to go with two assists. Tom Heinsohn chipped in 20 points and 13 caroms while Frank Ramsey paced the Celtics with 28 points on 11 of 24 shooting.

Boston trailed Syracuse, 68-60, at the break before outscoring the visitors, 70-57, in the second half.

The five-point (130-125) win over the Nationals seemed to provide the Celtics with a great deal of momentum as they would go onto sweep the Minneapolis Lakers and clinch the series on April 9, 1959, with a 118-113 victory.

Bill Russell concluded the four-game series averaging 29.5 rebounds per game while Sharman netted a game-high 28 points in game two.

Minneapolis’ Elgin Baylor averaged 22.75 points per game – he did record game-highs of 34 and 30 points in the first and final game, respectively. Boston limited the 1958-59 Rookie of the Year to just 13 points in game two and 14 in game three.

The win over the Lakers would be followed by additional championships and celebrations as the Celtics became the team to beat in the 1960s, winning nine of ten titles between 1960 and 1969.

Sunday Column: Why We Should All Root For Cleveland In The N.B.A. Finals

LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers are two wins away from winning the franchise's first N.B.A. Finals. (Photo Credit: Bleacher Report)
LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers are two wins away from winning the franchise’s first N.B.A. Finals. (Photo Credit: Bleacher Report)

By Matt Noonan 

The 2015 N.B.A. Finals have been a real treat.

Unlike past years that have pitted squads with championship resumes, this year’s finals features two teams representing cities desperate for hardware.

Cleveland hasn’t celebrated a championship since 1964, the year the Browns defeated the Baltimore Colts in the N.F.L. Championship.

Golden State – winners of the 1975 N.B.A. Finals – have come close to winning its fourth championship in franchise history, but have only appeared in the final round twice since defeating the Washington Bullets in four straight games.

Unlike Cleveland, Golden State, which plays its games in Oakland, has seen neighboring professional squads win titles. The Oakland Raiders and San Francisco 49ers have won Super Bowls since the 1970’s, while the Oakland A’s captured the 1988 World Series, sweeping the San Francisco Giants in four game. The Giants have won a trio of championships since 2010, including their franchise’s eighth World Series crown last fall.

The San Jose Sharks, however, are the lone Bay Area team without a championship. San Jose has appeared in the Western Conference Finals three times since the turn of the century, but suffered setbacks to the Calgary Flames (2004), Chicago Blackhawks (2010) and Vancouver Canucks (2011).

So, who needs this title more? The answer would be both Cleveland, right?

If Cleveland wins the title then it will probably call-off school, work and everything else the following day. Yet, if the series does go the distance, I guess school would be cancelled the following Monday, right?

The Bay Area has celebrated multiple championships. So, while Oakland and San Francisco would rejoice in the Warriors’ fourth franchise crown, it may not feel as special as Cleveland finally getting over the hump and winning a title.

Cleveland has seen its baseball team come close to winning a World Series title since capturing the 1948 World Series.

In 2013, the Indians attempted to extend its campaign to the round of eight, but lost to Tampa Bay in a play-in-game, 4-0. Cleveland concluded the game with nine hits – one more than the Rays – but could not muster a single run.

In 2007, the Indians fell to the Boston Red Sox – remember when they were good? – in the American League Championship Series and dropped a pair of American League Division Series in 2001 and 1999.

Cleveland did, however, appear in 1995 and 1997 World Series, but did not win.

The Indians saw its best chance to end the city’s championship drought in 1997 when they prolonged their championship series with Florida to seven games following a 4-1 victory in the sixth game. Yet, despite an early two-run lead in the final game of the Series, the Marlins rallied to even the game at 2-2 before plating the final run in the bottom of the 11th to win their first-ever crown.

As for the Cleveland Browns, they haven’t earned a postseason victory since 1989 after defeating Buffalo, 34-30. The Browns advanced to the Conference Championship following their win against the Bills, but fell to the Denver Broncos for the second time in three seasons by a score of 37-21.

Cleveland outscored the Broncos, 21-14, during the third stanza, but did not register a single point during the final 15 minutes. John Elway connected with Sammy Winder for a 39-yard touchdown strike, while David Treadwell kicked a pair of field goals during the final session to send the Broncos to the Super Bowl.

Since the turn of the century, the Browns have posted a pair of winning seasons, including a 9-7 mark during their 2002 campaign. Yet, similar to past years, the Browns fell in the playoffs, losing to rival Pittsburgh. Cleveland registered a 10-win season in 2007 – their most wins in a single-season since 1994 – but did not qualify for the postseason.

Let the debate rage on, who needs this championship? Cleveland or the Bay Area? I guess you would say, Cleveland, right?

Initially, I chose to Golden State to hoist the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy, but after rattling off Cleveland’s frustrating postseason setbacks, I guess I have to root for the Cavaliers.

Enjoy the remainder of the N.B.A. Finals and consider rooting for Cleveland, so they can finally celebrate a championship for the first time since “Can’t Buy Me Love” by The Beatles was a chart topper.