Daily Noontime: Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to April 1st, everyone – how is everyone doing?

We know this is going to be a tough month with the coronavirus (COVID-19), but we will be here providing both relief and some fun content.

And that content, which we deem fun (and enjoyable) begins today with our first ‘Daily Noontime’ for the month of April!


Noontime’s Headlines for Wednesday, April 1st, 2020 


On this Date in History 

  • 1999: Philadelphia 76ers coach Larry Brown wins his 900th professional game with an 88-84 win over the Miami Heat.
  • 2002: The University of Maryland men’s basketball team won its first-ever national championship in school history with a 64-52 win over Indiana in the 64th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship.
  • 2008: The New York Yankees set an MLB record by winning their 11th straight home opener with a 3-2 victory against the Toronto Blue Jays.
  • 2016: The Golden State Warriors‘ home winning streak of 54 games was snapped by the Boston Celtics. Boston won the game by a score of 109-106.

Daily Noontime: Wednesday, March 25th, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

Welcome to Wednesday, everyone!

I hope you are ALL doing well, staying safe and of course, keeping a smile on your face – we will get through this time together, I promise.

Let’s kick off the day with a brand new ‘Daily Noontime’ – again, remember to smile and think positively, friends.


Noontime’s Headlines for Wednesday, March 25th, 2020 

  • As mentioned yesterday in our midday ‘Daily Noontime,’ Tom Brady was officially introduced as a member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers via a phone conference, not an in-person press conference due to the coronavirus (COVID-19). And shortly after Brady was introduced as the newest member of the Buccaneers, the team produced a video on their YouTube channel that broke down/provided some insight on the greatest quarterback (ever!).
  • Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Bruce Arians told members of the media in yesterday’s phone call – well, the team’s phone conference with the press, to be exact – that he never thought Brady would leave the New England Patriots.

    “We had him ranked No. 1,” Arians said in yesterday’s call with the media. “If it happened, we would make a concerted effort and we did.”

  • With a slew of key members of the 20019 Patriots team gone to free agency, the organization is expected to receive four compensatory draft picks in 2021, which is good news, right?
  • According to the Boston Globe, ushers at the TD Garden have been laid off, due to the coronavirus. These part-time employees received a letter about the layoffs, as noted in the USA Today, and could be eligible for unemployment benefits.

    This is awful news to hear (and learn about), so we hope things do work out for these men and women during these unusual, but very tough times.

  • Finally, the NFL Network has been “forced to temporarily pull its live programing” due to an order by California Governor Gavin Newsom, who has ordered the state’s residents to stay home due to the coronavirus. Like us here in Massachusetts, California is allowing those that work jobs that are deemed essential to continue working, while others are asked to work from home.

On This Date in History

  • 1947: Holy Cross men’s basketball won the ninth NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship – the Crusaders beat Oklahoma, 58-47, to secure the program’s first victory in the title game.
  • 1971: The Boston Patriots became the New England Patriots.
  • 1972: Bobby Hull becomes the second NHL skaters to score 600 goals.
  • 1972: UCLA captured the 34th NCAAMen’s Basketball Championship with an 81-76 win over Florida. The victory provided the Bruins with their sixth-straight title, while Bill Walton was named the tournament’s most outstanding player.
  • 1982: Wayne Gretzky becomes the first NHL skaters to score 200 points in a season.

Commentary: Are You Ready For Life Without Sports?

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Are you ready for life without sports? (PHOTO COURTESY: CubesAndPiii on Visual Hunt / CC BY-ND)

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation

Get ready for a few weeks and months without sports – it is going to happen.

Due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), both this week and over the past few weeks, sports are going to take a backseat. And I am fine with that decision.

The health and well-being of our athletes, coaches, team representatives, and of course, the fans, is what matters most during this time.

I know many fans are upset – what will I do without sports? – while others believe the games (and practices) must go on. But I believe the only way we can return to the field and bleachers is by adhering to the advice of our doctors, health officials, and scientists, not angry parents or fans.

The decision to halt professional, college and high school sports was certainly not an easy one, but again, this decision, a domino effect on Thursday after the NBA suspended its season late Wednesday evening, was the right thing to do. And again, I know many, including college and high school seniors, were extremely distraught to hear their dreams of competing for a March Madness title or state championship would not occur, so I sympathize with these men and women, including the high school seniors that may not get a chance to compete this spring on the baseball or softball diamond or even the school’s outdoor track.

So, with really no local games or college basketball to watch today, tomorrow, and Sunday, I guess it is time to embark into a world that won’t include sports, but instead concerns over the well-being of our family, friends, colleagues, and neighbors.

Will we read more books?

Will we binge-watch, both old and new shows?

Will we get outside and soak in the sun (when its nice, of course)?

Or will we just hunker down and wait for the apocalypse of the coronavirus to vanish?

No matter what happens, life will be different – I guarantee it – but as I mentioned earlier today in my ‘Daily Noontime,’ we will persevere and come back stronger. And that is because I am an optimist.

While I know many of you may find life quite boring and odd these next few weeks and months without sports, just remember that our favorite teams and athletes will eventually reemerge. But until that time comes, we just need to smile, laugh, and find something else to do to keep us preoccupied while we anxiously await the return of professional, college, and high school sports.

COVID-19 Cancels March Madness, NCAA Winter & Spring Championships

By Matt Noonan 

Due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), the NCAA has decided to cancel both its winter and spring championships for all three divisions, including March Madness, which was supposed to occur next week without fans in the stands.

The announcement of the cancelations was made this afternoon through a statement, which was seen both on the NCAA website and social media. The statement from the NCAA was the following:

Today, NCAA President Mark Emmert and the Board of Governors canceled the Division I men’s and women’s 2020 basketball tournaments, as well as all remaining winter and spring NCAA championships. This decision is based on the evolving COVID-19 public health threat, our ability to ensure the events do not contribute to spread of the pandemic, and the impracticality of hosting such events at any time during this academic year given ongoing decisions by other entities.

Shortly after the cancelations were announced, D3Hoops.com confirmed both D-III tournaments were canceled, including contests that were scheduled to take place this weekend at Amherst CollegeBowdoin College, and Tufts University.

As noted in the report on D3Hoops.com this afternoon, the Tufts men’s basketball team learned of the news on a bus ride to Brockport, New York. The Jumbos were scheduled to tip-off on Saturday, March 14th against the College of Brockport in the third round of the NCAA D-III Men’s Basketball Tournament.

Prior to the NCAA announcement, multiple professional leagues began suspending its current season, including Major League Soccer (MLS), the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the National Hockey League (NHL). Additionally, both Major League Baseball (MLB) and Minor League Baseball (MLB) announced they would be delaying the start of their respective seasons for two weeks.

Finally, the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) announced they were canceling both its basketball and hockey championships this weekend.

March Madness Will Not Include Fans Due To Coronavirus Concerns

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No fans will be allowed at this year’s NCAA March Madness Tournaments. (PHOTO COURTESY: dayseraph on Visual hunt / CC BY-NC-ND)

By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

This year’s NCAA D-I men’s and women’s basketball tournaments won’t look the way they have in the past because none of the upcoming contests will include fans.

Due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), especially these past few days, the NCAA announced Wednesday afternoon that both tournaments would occur, but not include fans. Teams will play in empty arenas in front of teammates, coaches, essential staff and family members, according to NCAA president Mark Emmert

In a statement to the public, Emmert confirmed his decision to not allow fans to attend either tournament after consulting with public health officials. 

“Based on their advice and my discussions with the NCAA Board of Governors, I have made the decision to conduct our upcoming championship events, including the Division I men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, with only essential staff and limited family attendance,” said Emmert, via today’s release on NCAA.org.

The NCAA President would continue by adding, “While I understand how disappointing this is for all fans of our sports, my decision is based on the current understanding of how COVID-19 is progressing in the United States. This decision is in the best interest of public health, including that of coaches, administrators, fans and, most importantly, our student-athletes.”

Prior to the NCAA announcing no fans would be allowed to attend this year’s March Madness, the Ivy League canceled its conference tournaments on Tuesday morning, which were scheduled to take place this weekend at Harvard University.

Earlier today, it was announced (and confirmed) that the Golden State Warriors would play against the Brooklyn Nets on Thursday, March 12th with no fans in the stands.

This evening, the Big Ten Conference (B10) announced tomorrow’s men’s conference tournament would be limited to student-athletes, coaches, event staff, essential team, and conference members. Additionally, the conference will permit TV network partners, credentialed media, and immediate family members of the participating teams.

Jeff Goodman, who is a basketball analyst for Stadium, reported this evening there are discussions happening about possibly postponing or evening canceling the NCAA Tournament and Final Four.” 

As more information develops and becomes available, we will make sure to update this post and our site with new blog posts.