Tag: Rob Manfred

Daily Noontime: Monday, February 1, 2021

By NoontimeSports.com

Happy Monday, everyone, and welcome to the first day of February!

We’re expecting a nor’easter to arrive in our neighborhood shortly, so please make sure your car is parked on the correct side of the street as we certainly don’t want complaints of parking tickets flooding our email inbox tomorrow, Wednesday and Thursday.

Yet, before the snow, rain, and slush arrive, allow us to kickstart the day with a brand new Daily Noontime for Monday, February 1, 2021.

As usual, be well, stay safe, hold the line, and smile – we’re almost there!


Monday’s Headlines & Links (February 1, 2021)

  • Let’s start the day with perhaps the biggest news blast (and update) in our email this morning: Theo Epstein, who guided both the Boston Red Sox and Chicago Cubs to World Series victories as en executive for both ball clubs, has joined Arctos Sports Partners, which is a firm that buys minority shares of pro clubs.

    Today’s announcement comes just one day after an SB Nation shared an interesting post (and read) from The Athletic, which asked the following question: who should be the next Major League Baseball (MLB) commissioner?

    As we all know, Rob Manfred is the current MLB Commissioner, but putting Theo Epstein in charge may not be a bad idea as the sport could certainly use his help with being just as innovative as the other professional leagues.
  • Welcome to Super Bowl week, which promises to be quite different due to the coronavirus pandemic. But as one sports writer – Jay Mariottiwonders (and writes), is reaching the championship game a win for the National Football League (NFL) or perhaps a sign that our country has turned a blind eye to this deadly virus?
  • College basketball conference championships are on the horizon, which seems crazy, right? But as one west coast reporter write, the Pac-12 is not planning to cancel its conference tournament next month.

    Similar to NCAA D-I college football, the college basketball season has not been pretty – we have seen a lot of starts and stops, along with some programs calling it quits, but don’t be surprised if you see some teams or conferences pull the plug on their respective postseason.
  • The Los Angeles Rams apparently have a new quarterback for the 2021 season as they sent Jared Goff to the Detroit Lions in exchange for Matthew Stafford. But prior to acquiring Matthew Stafford late Saturday evening, the Rams tried to trade for Aaron Rodgers, but the Green Bay Packers said, “no way!”

Monday’s Podcast Alert ūüö®

  • Today on the Noontime Sports Podcast, Matt Noonan welcomes Scottie Rodgers, who is the director of communications with the Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Texas.

    Noonan and Rodgers discuss how the sports communication world has changed due to the pandemic, including how Zoom press conferences could be part of the “new normal.” Rodgers also discussed his role (and involvement) with the Racial and Social Justice Initiative Planning Committee and Diversity and Inclusion Committee.
  • You can listen to today’s interview, as well as past shows by visiting our Anchor page!

We’ll be back with more later today, but for now, be well, stay safe, and smile, everyone!

Daily Noontime (Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020)

By Matt Noonan

Hello Tuesday – how are you?

From a quick look outside our window, Tuesday look rather gloomy and cloudy – that is in the Boston area, to be exact!

Let’s get to some news (and links), beginning with Major League Baseball (MLB) where the 30-team league “amassed an unprecedented $8.3 billion of debt from their various lender” this summer and fall. The league will also lose between $2.8-3 billion in operational losses, according to Rob Manfred, who conveyed the not-so-great news to Sportico yesterday.

A big reason for the debt was due to no fans in the stands, which is because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. And if Manfred and the league does not have fans in the stands next season, which is certainly a possibility, especially in California and New York, then MLB could be face some additional challenges.

The 2020 MLB season could conclude either this evening or tomorrow in Texas – as of now, the Los Angeles Dodgers are one game away from winning their first Fall Classic since 1988. The Dodgers beat the Tampa Bay Rays, 4-2, on Sunday in the fifth game of the World Series.

I am thinking the Dodgers will clinch the World Series this evening – just a gut feeling – but I could also see the Rays winning tonight to force a game seven tomorrow evening.

Let’s switch gears to college basketball where we learned yesterday that some early season contests and events that were initially scheduled to occur in Orlando, Florida next month, as well as in the beginning of December, will not happen. The main reason ESPN, which was scheduled to host these tournaments, pulled the plug was so everyone could stay safe and healthy.

ESPN’s public relations team released a statement on Twitter about the tournaments they were planning to host with the following message to their college basketball fans: “ESPN Events set out to create a protected environment for teams to participate in early-season events in Orlando. Based on certain challenges surrounding testing protocols, we opted to resume these tournaments during the 2021-22 season.”

Alright, that will conclude a short and to-the-point version of the ‘Daily Noontime,’ but we will be back with another blog post (or two) later today!

MLB Continues To Be Impacted By Covid-19

By Matt Noonan

For the second-straight day, Major League Baseball (MLB) is in the news. And it is not good news for those wondering.

According to various reports from earlier today, more members of the Miami Marlins have tested positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19) while their fifth contest of the 2020 season against the Baltimore Orioles has been postponed. The New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies will also not take the field this evening as their game was postponed, too.

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More members of the Miami Marlins have tested positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19) on Tuesday, July 28. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Miami began its 2020 campaign in Philadelphia and was initially scheduled to host the Orioles last night.

These postponements are not good news for the sport, which hoped to provide some sense of normalcy to many during this unprecedented time. But instead of feeling excited about baseball returning, there seem to be growing fears over if and how this season can continue as it is likely that other players, coaches, and team members will contract the virus over the next few days, weeks, and months.

Of course, we want everyone to stay safe and healthy – these are such scary times – but while other sports have been sent to resume or begin their respective seasons in a “bubble,” one might wonder why MLB did not do this. Yes, there was some talk of sending certain teams and divisions to various areas of the country months ago, but as of now a slew of states, including Arizona, California, Florida, and Texas are experiencing an uptick of coronavirus cases, which does not bode well for teams visiting these areas over the next few weeks and months.

One reporter tweeted an hour ago that it is “unlikely” Baltimore and Miami won’t play in Maryland on Wednesday and Thursday.

We also just learned a short time ago that players on the Washington Nationals have voted to not make the trek to Miami, Florida this weekend to face the Marlins. According to both Ken Rosenthal and Jeff Passan, the league will have the final say.

Should MLB Pause Or Stop The 2020 Season?

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Should Major League Baseball (MLB) Commissioner Rob Manfred consider ending the 2020 season? (PHOTO COURTESY: Lynne Sladky/Associated Press)

By Matt Noonan

Rob Manfred might want to consider pressing the pause button or perhaps shutting down the 2020 Major League Baseball (MLB) season.

With today’s news of 14 members of the Miami Marlins¬†testing positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19), perhaps this is a sign that maybe, just maybe, traveling to play baseball during a pandemic this summer is not something we should do.

The 2020 season – a short, 60-game sprint – began last week with some bad news when¬† Juan Soto, an outfielder for the¬†Washington Nationals, tested positive prior to his team’s initial contest against the¬†New York Yankees. Soto recently tested negative but needs an additional negative result before returning to the diamond.

Let’s hope Soto does test negative (again), so we can see him back on the field either later this week or next month.

But while we anxiously await word of Soto’s next test, it just seems likely that we will learn of more players, along with coaches and staff members that will test positive for the virus as the season progresses. The United State of America has recorded more than four million cases of Covid-19, while 1.3 million individuals have recovered

Baseball, unlike other sports that have restarted, is not playing in a “bubble,” so the chances of players, coaches, and staff members testing positive for the virus seems more likely from staying in hotels to traveling to various ballparks on planes and busses.

No matter what happens, Manfred, along with the owners, coaches, and players knew they were taking a risk with playing games during a pandemic, but is it worth the risk continuing to play with cases on the rise in various states across the country, including here in Massachusetts?

 

Daily Noontime: Thursday, March 26th, 2020

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By Matt Noonan | @NoontimeNation 

It’s Thursday – hope everyone is doing well and staying safe as usual!

Let’s make today another great day – remember to smile, please! – with a brand new ‘Daily Noontime.’


Noontime’s Headlines for Thursday, March 26th, 2020


On This Date in History: 

  • 1952:¬†Kansas¬†beat¬†St. John’s in the 14th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship – the tournament featured the first-ever “Final Four” format.
  • 1979:¬†Michigan State¬†beat¬†Indiana State, 75-64, in the 41st NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship, which was the highest-rated game in the history of televised college basketball. And what made this game so special (and exciting) was it started the rivalry of future¬†NBA¬†Hall of Famers¬†Magic Johnson¬†and¬†Larry Bird.
  • 1992: The¬†New York Rangers¬†clinched its first¬†NHL¬†regular-season championship in 50 years.
  • 1997: The NHL announced the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and Vancouver Canucks would open the 1998 season in Japan.