Tag: Syracuse University

Getting To Know Nathaniel Hackett (Denver Broncos)

Nathaniel Hackett, who oversaw the Green Bay Packers offense for the last three seasons, has been named the head coach of the Denver Broncos. (PHOTO COURTESY: Green Bay Packers)

By NoontimeSports.com

The Denver Broncos have a new head coach. And his name is Nathaniel Hackett.

According to various reports, Hackett, who was previously the offensive coordinator for the Green Bay Packers, will become the new coach of the Broncos — he takes over for Vic Fangio, who guided the Orange and Blue for the last three seasons.

Hackett is the first coordinator or assistant coach to fill one of the National Football League’s (NFL) head coaching vacancies — others will be named over the next few days and weeks — but before he inks his name on a new contract, let’s learn about the new leader of the Broncos.

  • Nathaniel is the son of Paul Hackett, a former professional and collegiate football coach that was born in Burlington, Vermont. Paul held numerous coordinator or assistant roles in the NFL but was a head coach twice for the University of Pittsburgh and University of Southern California.

  • Hackett played football at the University of California, Davis. He earned the George Belenis Award as a co-scout team player of the year in 1998 with Trae Milton before earning the Bob Foster Aggie Pride Award in 2002.  
      
  • His coaching career began in 2003 as the UC Davis assistant linebacker’s coach before earning additional roles with Stanford University and Syracuse University. He spent two years at Stanford – he was a specialist/recruiting coordinator in 2005.

  • In 2006, Hackett made his NFL debut with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as their offensive quality control coach before accepting the same duties in 2008 and 2009 with the Buffalo Bills.

  • Most recently, he was spotted on the sidelines with the Jacksonville Jaguars as both their quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator before joining Matt LaFleur in Green Bay to oversee the offense the last three seasons.  

Our “Getting to Know” series, a first-ever in the history of Noontime Sports, will introduce our football fans and friends to new head coaches in the NFL. Be on the lookout for future posts once more teams announce their next coach for the upcoming 2022 season.

Noontime Celebrate 12-Years Of Blogging

By NoontimeSports.com

12-years ago, our journey — well, more the story of Noontime Sports officially began. And it has been quite a ride.

Our sports media journey officially began on a humid afternoon on May 14, 2009, with a post about Greg Paulus, who played college basketball at Duke University and football at Syracuse University as a graduate student. He did attempt to earn a roster spot with the New Orleans Saints in 2010 but sadly did not make the cut.

Since our initial post, our blog has featured a variety of posts on many topics — we would say a lot of the content centers around Boston sports, New England colleges and high schools, and sometimes, the National Football League (NFL).

In addition to blogs, we have produced a ton of videos that can be seen on our YouTube channel and have hosted a slew of podcasts — last year, we shifted our show from WordPress to Anchor, and our podcast can be heard on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.

Four years ago, we produced a video about eight years of blogging — and yes, creating content — but we’re proud to celebrate 12-years with our fans and friends. It has not been an easy 14 months with so many local (and regional) sports offline (or on the sidelines until this winter or early spring) due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but we’re optimistic and excited to return to covering games in-person next month while generating ideas for fall sports coverage.

As we begin this exciting next chapter, we want to thank our fans, followers, and friends — your support means so much to us, and we truly appreciate you stopping by the site once, twice or a few times each week while engaging with our various posts on social media. We love producing content on a variety of sports topics and plan to do it for a very long time.

So, here is to the next step — the next chapter, to be exact! — and we look forward to having you join us on what should be an exciting post-pandemic ride filled with some exciting memories and moments.

Noontime’s Black History Month: Jim Brown

By NoontimeSports.com

Our Black History Month weekday posts that honor the men and women, who have and continue to make an impact on the sports – and yes, athletics world – continues today with getting to know Jim Brown.

Jim Brown is considered one of the greatest to play professional football. (PHOTO COURTESY: Biography.com)

Jim Brown is considered by many as one of the greatest to play professional football – he was also a tremendous lacrosse player, too.

Like we have earlier this week, let’s get to know Jim Brown more, as well as share some must-reads on the former Cleveland Browns halfback.

Getting to know Jim Brown:

  • Jim Brown maybe known for his playing days with the Cleveland Browns, but he is also a sports analyst and actor. He was also a part owner of the New York Lizards, who used to be a member of Major League Lacrosse (The MLL was absorbed by the Premier Lacrosse League (PLL) last December).
  • Brown was born in St. Simmons Island, Georgia – his father, Swinton Brown, was a professional boxer. He attended Manhasset Secondary School where he earned 13 varsity letters for playing football, lacrosse, baseball, basketball, and running track. His success on the playing field continued as a student-athlete at Syracuse University where he became an All-American in football and lacrosse. He was the men’s basketball team’s top scorer and finished fifth in the college decathlon.
  • With the Orange, Brown received the nickname “First Down Brown,” and recorded quite a few first downs against Colgate University in 1956 when he scored six touchdowns and recorded seven extra points.

    During that same season, he tallied 21 points against Boston University before posting the same amount against Texas Christian in the Cotton Bowl. TCU won the 1957 Cotton Bowl by a score of 28-27, but Jim Brown was named the game’s Most Valuable Player.
  • Jim Brown played nine seasons in the National Football League (NFL) – all nine were spent with the Cleveland Browns – and tallied 12,312 rushing yards, including 1,863 yards in 1963. He also scored 106 touchdowns in 1963.
  • A one-time NFL champion with the Cleveland Browns in 1964 when they beat the Baltimore Colts, Brown is a nine-time pro bowler, eight-time first-team all-pro, and earned a trio of AP NFL Most Valuable Player awards in 1957, 1958, and 1965. He was tabbed the NFL’s Rookie of the Year in 1957, and led the league in rushing eight times (1957-1961 and 1963-1965.
  • Brown retired from the NFL during the summer of 1966 – his decision stunned the football world as many wondered what he would have accomplished had he played another nine seasons. But something worth noting, he never missed a single game with the Cleveland Browns.
  • After retiring from football, Brown starred in numerous movies and became the first African American to announce a televised boxing match. He founded the Amer-I-Can Program, a national program that is focused on empowering individuals to “take charge of their lives and achieve their full potential.”
  • Jim Brown was named to the NFL’s All-Time Team in November 2019.

Articles and Links on Jim Brown:

We’ll be back next Monday for another week of our Black History Month sports posts!

Athletes Unlimited Adds Lacrosse As Its Third Sport

Kayla Treanor, who competed for the US National Team in 2017, headlines 22 women’s lacrosse players that will compete in the first-ever Athletes Unlimited league next summer. (PHOTO COURTESY: U.S. Lacrosse/The Daily Gazette)

By Matt Noonan

Athletes Unlimited is growing.

And yesterday – Tuesday, October 20, to be exact – Athletes Unlimited, which has attracted a slew of elite and professional female athletes over the past few months to compete in its softball and indoor volleyball leagues, announced they will be adding a women’s lacrosse league with the inaugural season set to begin next July.

The league, according to yesterday’s release on its website, will commence after the 2021 World Cup which is scheduled to take place in Towson, Maryland next year from Wednesday, July 7 to Saturday, July 17.

“Women’s lacrosse is one of the fastest growing sports in the United States and incredibly popular among young players and fans,” said Jon Patricof, who is the CEO and Co-Founder of Athletes Unlimited, via yesterday’s release. “Our leagues are all about excitement, storytelling, and fan engagement so lacrosse is the perfect addition to our network of pro sports leagues which already includes softball and indoor volleyball.”

The 2021 Athletes Unlimited Lacrosse league will be extremely innovated, featuring eight minute quarters, 9-on-9 gameplay, and a 60-second shot clock. 56 players will play in this league, which will feature four teams of 14 players. Additionally, each session will begin with a draw.

As of today, 22 female lacrosse players have committed to the initial season, including Kayla Treanor, who is played at Syracuse University and was a member of the 2017 US National Team, which captured the gold medal at the World Cup.

Michele “DJ” Dejuliis, who was the original CEO and Founder of the Women’s Professional Lacrosse League (WPLL), will oversee the league as a Senior Director of Lacrosse for Athletes Unlimited.

To learn more about Athletes Unlimited, visit their website, as well as stay connected with them on social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube).

NCAA D-III Reduces Number Of Games Required For Championship Selection

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NCAA D-III Football teams will only need to compete in five games this season to be eligible for the postseason. (PHOTO COURTESY: Visualunt.com)

By Matt Noonan

The upcoming NCAA D-III sports season will look a bit different than usual due to the ongoing pandemic, which brought an end to multiple winter championships in March, along with numerous spring sports seasons.

Yesterday the Division III Administrative Committee approved the recommendation from the Division III Membership and Championships Committee to allow its various members to compete in fewer contests than usual this upcoming school year – 33 percent less than normal, to be exact – so they can be eligible to contend for a national title.

The reduction of contests will allow each institution to remain in compliance to compete for a championship but also provide flexibility for athletic departments when it comes to scheduling to “seeking relief in the form of waivers.”

“We hope that a reduction in contest minimums will provide flexibility to our member schools as they work to reopen during what is a very uncertain and complex time,” said Tori Murden McClure, the chair of the committee and Spalding president, in Friday’s release. “We understand this won’t fix everything for everyone, but we believe it is the right move at this time and we will remain flexible moving forward.”

The flexibility will certainly help schools when it comes to reopening – it is possible some schools could start earlier or later like a slew of Division I institutions announced this month, including Notre Dame and Syracuse University.

Football teams, including those here in New England, would only need to compete in five contests this fall to be eligible to compete in the NCAA D-III postseason while basketball teams will need to play 12 contests.

As of now, it appears fall championships will occur, but those plans could be altered due to the coronavirus (Covid-19).