MLB Continues To Be Impacted By Covid-19

By Matt Noonan

For the second-straight day, Major League Baseball (MLB) is in the news. And it is not good news for those wondering.

According to various reports from earlier today, more members of the Miami Marlins have tested positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19) while their fifth contest of the 2020 season against the Baltimore Orioles has been postponed. The New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies will also not take the field this evening as their game was postponed, too.

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More members of the Miami Marlins have tested positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19) on Tuesday, July 28. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Miami began its 2020 campaign in Philadelphia and was initially scheduled to host the Orioles last night.

These postponements are not good news for the sport, which hoped to provide some sense of normalcy to many during this unprecedented time. But instead of feeling excited about baseball returning, there seem to be growing fears over if and how this season can continue as it is likely that other players, coaches, and team members will contract the virus over the next few days, weeks, and months.

Of course, we want everyone to stay safe and healthy – these are such scary times – but while other sports have been sent to resume or begin their respective seasons in a “bubble,” one might wonder why MLB did not do this. Yes, there was some talk of sending certain teams and divisions to various areas of the country months ago, but as of now a slew of states, including Arizona, California, Florida, and Texas are experiencing an uptick of coronavirus cases, which does not bode well for teams visiting these areas over the next few weeks and months.

One reporter tweeted an hour ago that it is “unlikely” Baltimore and Miami won’t play in Maryland on Wednesday and Thursday.

We also just learned a short time ago that players on the Washington Nationals have voted to not make the trek to Miami, Florida this weekend to face the Marlins. According to both Ken Rosenthal and Jeff Passan, the league will have the final say.

Should MLB Pause Or Stop The 2020 Season?

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Should Major League Baseball (MLB) Commissioner Rob Manfred consider ending the 2020 season? (PHOTO COURTESY: Lynne Sladky/Associated Press)

By Matt Noonan

Rob Manfred might want to consider pressing the pause button or perhaps shutting down the 2020 Major League Baseball (MLB) season.

With today’s news of 14 members of the Miami Marlins testing positive for the coronavirus (Covid-19), perhaps this is a sign that maybe, just maybe, traveling to play baseball during a pandemic this summer is not something we should do.

The 2020 season – a short, 60-game sprint – began last week with some bad news when  Juan Soto, an outfielder for the Washington Nationals, tested positive prior to his team’s initial contest against the New York Yankees. Soto recently tested negative but needs an additional negative result before returning to the diamond.

Let’s hope Soto does test negative (again), so we can see him back on the field either later this week or next month.

But while we anxiously await word of Soto’s next test, it just seems likely that we will learn of more players, along with coaches and staff members that will test positive for the virus as the season progresses. The United State of America has recorded more than four million cases of Covid-19, while 1.3 million individuals have recovered

Baseball, unlike other sports that have restarted, is not playing in a “bubble,” so the chances of players, coaches, and staff members testing positive for the virus seems more likely from staying in hotels to traveling to various ballparks on planes and busses.

No matter what happens, Manfred, along with the owners, coaches, and players knew they were taking a risk with playing games during a pandemic, but is it worth the risk continuing to play with cases on the rise in various states across the country, including here in Massachusetts?

 

Daily Noontime: Friday, July 24, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com 

It’s Friday – yay, we made it!

Welcome to a brand new weekend, which is going to be HOT here in New England, so make sure to drink plenty of water and wear some sunscreen, too.

Let’s kickoff National Drive-Thru Day with a brand new Daily Noontime – let’s go!


Noontime’s Headlines for Friday, July 24, 2020 

  • Aaron Judge and the New York Yankees began their 60-game sprint with a 4-1 win last night over the Washington Nationals.

    Judge recorded a pair of hits in the “rain-shortened” game last night – once again, he will be a player to watch over the next few weeks and months.

  • Mookie Betts and the Los Angeles Dodgers commenced their 60-game season last night with a convincing 8-1 win over the San Francisco Giants. Remember when Mookie played for the Boston Red Sox?
  • In case you missed it, the Independent School League (ISL) announced yesterday that they will not be playing many games this fall due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

    According to Danny Ventura of the Boston Herald, the ISL will not have championships this fall nor dish out awards. The league does, however, hope to provide some competition this fall, pending it is safe to do so.

  • Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker will toss the ceremonial first pitch this evening before the Boston Red Soxplay their initial game of the 2020 season against the Baltimore Orioles.
  • Speaking of the Red Sox, here are a few storylines to follow this season – well, more these next few weeks and months.

On This Date In History: Wednesday, April 22nd, 2020

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By NoontimesSports.com 

Happy Wednesday, everyone!

We hope (as usual) that everyone is doing well, staying safe, and smiling, of course. The sun is shining outside our window, but it is a bit chilly and windy today, so make sure to bundle up if you need to go outside to the store or for a walk.

Let’s take another trip down memory lane with a brand new ‘On This Date in History’ for Wednesday, April 22, 2020. Have a great day, everyone!


On This Date in History: April 22nd, 2020

  • 1876: The Boston Red Stockings defeated the Philadelphia Athletics, 6-5, in the first National League game in the history of baseball.
  • 1954: At the annual owners’ meeting in New York, Daniel Biasone, who was the founding owner of the Syracuse Nationals, which would become the Philadelphia 76ers, “proposed a rule that would force each team to take a shot within 24 seconds of gaining possession.”According to the New York Times, Biasone felt 24 seconds would allow each team to attempt an average of 60 shots per game. “My idea was to keep the game going, to speed it up,” Biasone said, via Charles Paikert.
  • 1995: John Smoltz, who spent a majority of his big league career pitching for the Atlanta Braves, recorded his 3,000th strikeout on this date when he retired Washington Nationals infielder Felipe Lopez in the top of the third inning.Smoltz joined an impressive list of MLB pitchers that recorded 3,000 strikeouts or more, including Nolan RyanRandy JohnsonRoger ClemensSteve Carlton, and Bert Blyleven.
  • 2010: With the first pick in the 2010 NFL Draft, the St. Louis Rams selected quarterback, Sam Bradford, who quarterbacked Oklahoma in the Big 12Ndamukong Suh, a defensive tackle from Nebraska, was selected second by the Detroit Lions while Gerald McCoy, who also played defensive tackle, was picked third by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.The New England Patriots selected Devin McCourty with the 27th pick., McCourty, who played collegiately at Rutgers, has enjoyed a very successful career with the Patriots, winning three Super Bowls while becoming a player to watch on the defense.

On This Date In History: Sunday, April 5th, 2020

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By NoontimeSports.com | @NoontimeNation 

Happy Sunday, everyone!

As usual, we hope EVERYONE is doing well and staying safe – we will overcome this unusual time.

And as mentioned yesterday, we are starting a new daily post – On This Date in History – so let’s highlight some exciting (and amazing) sports memories that occurred on April 5th.


On This Date in History: April 5th

  • 1967: Wilt Chamberlain sets NBA record of 41 rebounds in a postseason contest against the Boston Celtics.
  • 1973: The NFL announces a jersey-number system that assigns certain ranges of numbers to each player position from which they can choose.
  • 1984: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar breaks Wilt Chamberlain’s all-time career scoring record.
  • 1990: John Stockton reaches 1,000 assists for the third consecutive season.
  • 1998: The Arizona Diamondbacks win their first-ever win in franchise history with a 3-2 victory over the San Francisco Giants. The win over the Giants snapped a five-game losing streak – it was the worst start for any expansion team in MLB history.
  • 2005: The Washington Nationals lose their inaugural season-opener to the Philadelphia Phillies. The contest marked the first time a professional baseball team competed (and represented) the nation’s capitals since the Washington Senators departed the area following the 1971 season.
  • 2014: Minnesota Twins manager Ron Gardenhire earned his 1,000th career win when his team beat the Cleveland Indians, 7-3.
  • 2016: Breanna Stewart led the Connecticut women’s basketball team to an NCAA Championship win over Syracuse by netting 24 points.
  • 2019: Oklahoma City‘s Russell Westbrook‘s becomes the first player in NBA history to average a triple-double for three-straight years after leading the Thunder to a 123-110 win over the Detroit Pistons.